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 congratulations now you are very skilled person💪. I hope you will sell everything next time 😉. Now I feel like you. I can not choose the size of the wick for 2 oz tins (diameter 6,2 mm). Before that, I did a lot of tests for glass jars and I found good option. I was sure that I could use the same size in tins🙄But it was my biggest mistake 😫.

So I have (cured time 2 months):

1. c3 100%, wedo eco 10 wick. It is veeery small, after 2h burning melt pool was less 48 mm. 

2. c3 80%+coconut 20%, wedo eco 12. It is veeery big. After 1h burning, tins was melted and the smell of burnt, not FO.

 

I know that I should try pure C3, but I don't have time now😭. What do you think about eco 12 in this tins with c3 (without coco)? Can it be so big different with 20% coconut? If someone have experience with TCR wick with c3 in tins?

And eco 12 was not pre-waxed. Is it some differences with waxed wicks?

Edited by Crazy Fox

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3 hours ago, Crazy Fox said:

 congratulations now you are very skilled person💪. I hope you will sell everything next time 😉. Now I feel like you. I can not choose the size of the wick for 2 oz tins (diameter 6,2 mm). Before that, I did a lot of tests for glass jars and I found good option. I was sure that I could use the same size in tins🙄But it was my biggest mistake 😫.

So I have (cured time 2 months):

1. c3 100%, wedo eco 10 wick. It is veeery small, after 2h burning melt pool was less 48 mm. 

2. c3 80%+coconut 20%, wedo eco 12. It is veeery big. After 1h burning, tins was melted and the smell of burnt, not FO.

 

I know that I should try pure C3, but I don't have time now😭. What do you think about eco 12 in this tins with c3 (without coco)? Can it be so big different with 20% coconut? If someone have experience with TCR wick with c3 in tins?

And eco 12 was not pre-waxed. Is it some differences with waxed wicks?

I would do a wickectomy on the C3 from eco10 to eco12 and see if your performance is better. 
 

if you really want to use coconut, drop that to maybe 5 or 10% tops. coconut oil (and coconut waxes) destabilize soy. That easily explains the big melt pool.

 

one thing that made soy waxes like C3 perform better in my tins was diluting it with a “naked” soy like 415 or midwest soy. Sometimes the pre-blends like c1, C3, 444, etc. have too much additive.

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13 hours ago, TallTayl said:

I would do a wickectomy on the C3 from eco10 to eco12 and see if your performance is better. 
 

if you really want to use coconut, drop that to maybe 5 or 10% tops. coconut oil (and coconut waxes) destabilize soy. That easily explains the big melt pool.

 

one thing that made soy waxes like C3 perform better in my tins was diluting it with a “naked” soy like 415 or midwest soy. Sometimes the pre-blends like c1, C3, 444, etc. have too much additive.

Thanks so much for the advice🙏. I will continue my experiment. Can you tell, please, where you find information on  additives in waxes. I want to learn about c3, 464 and kerax

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1 hour ago, Crazy Fox said:

Thanks so much for the advice🙏. I will continue my experiment. Can you tell, please, where you find information on  additives in waxes. I want to learn about c3, 464 and kerax

I search out technical publications written by the manufacturer and often call the manufacturer directly. I have friends and colleagues in various industries that help start conversations at trade shows. The society of cosmetic chemists has also opened a lot of doors. 

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One thing I’ve had to figure out is that the candle wax formulas change without notice in response to consumer demand.   Instead of people learning to wick properly for nice throw, many just add more more more FO, which creates demand for waxes that hold more FO. 

 

many FO retailers don’t create FO for single use (candles) as the market demands fragrance to fit multiple duties, like soap and lotion.  This limits aromachemicals that perform outstandingly well in candles. Likewise the removal of phthalates due to consumer misunderstanding has thrown a wrench in things. 

 

Retailers also order concentrations that are suitable for home crafters who use more more more in products. Without understanding safety guidelines such as IFRA, people would cause themselves and others real harm. Plus, super concentrated FO is not generally $14 a lb by the lb common retail. I guess FO retailers make their money on FO volume sold, so if their customers need to use 12% and up to get throw, which throws the wax balance out of whack, then add more fragrance binding ingredients to make up the difference. And the cycle continues. 

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