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Coco/Apricot Candle Just Not Throwing.. (Hot)


TheNovice
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Hi all,

 

Completely new to candle making, but am having a really frustrating time trying to get our Lab & Co. coconut and apricot wax to throw.  We're also using their fragrances, which makes this even more frustrating! From where I stand, we've done some pretty solid testing and have made a very nice candle.  Wax is being maintained at the correct temperature when adding our fragrance (keeping a load around 8-9%, no sweating is occuring), letting cure a few days.. but when we do our burn test, there just really isn't any noticeable smell unless you're right next to it/over the flame, and it's really dissappointing. 

 

We really wanted to learn how to make strong, long-lasting natural candles.. but when we compare the hot throw to other brands such as Bath & Body Works who probably use more soy/parrafen blends, there really is just no comparision.  I guess also we're comparing larger 3-wick cotton wick candles to our single, 7oz wooden wick candle, but I'd figure I'd be able to just smell at least something. It's just concerning because our end-goal is to be able to sell our candles, but I don't see how people would actually spend a higher premium on an natural/coconut based candle when the throw just isn't even close to what other candles can provide.  Add in the fact that they burn slower so you don't get much scent during a casual, short-term use like most people use, and it makes me question how it's even a viable option.  Not to mention, the maintenance on a wooden wick... I have a feeling most customers never trim theirs.

 

Is it just me? Am I just really bad at this, or are my expectations just completely not in line with what a vegetable wax will be able to provide? Our candle appears to be wicked perfectly and has a nice, beautiful flame that has a solid even melt pool in about 2 hours. Less than 1/2" deep.

 

Anyone have any tips?

Edited by TheNovice
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If you have a quick melt pool with a wax like coconut, it makes me is over wicked.  That can kill throw right there.  Likewise, as that candle continues to burn, more heat will build in that jar.  What would happen during a power burn?

 

Curing, even itch coconut helps. 

 

Pictures may help too,

 

you could have candle nose.

 

it is very possible to get a strong throw with that jar and a natural wax, absolutely. Like everything you need to find that magic sweet spot of wick with your waxes and FO.

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Definitely don't think it's too quick.  It's gets a melt pool in 2-3 hours.  I thought that was ideal? Flame is perfect.  Not large (no soot), and not a dim flame.  It's a strong, normal sized flame for a wooden wick.  We originally were over wicked at 1/2" width, but went down to 3/8" and it seemed to definitely help.

I just don't understand what I'm doing wrong then, lol.  I just put the candle in our bathroom and closed the door.. maybe we're just testing in to large of a space and the candle can't throw in the room? Is that even a thing? I'm out of  ideas, haha.

Edited by TheNovice
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With coconut wax, throw away everything you know about other waxes.  It is super soft and will continue to melt into a clear mess the further down the container if it is overwicked at the top. 

 

Wooden wicks come in different materials and thicknesses not just width. A difference of as little as 0.01” is a LOt with a wood wick. 

 

I’ve been working with coconut waxes for a couple of years now, and have learned to unlearn to succeed with the wax. 

 

Edited to add, in a 7/oz straight sided jar, you can fill several rooms with scent if wicked right. 

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Yes, you raise some very good points.  And regarding the wick, completely understood.  We're using a booster 0.20x0.20, 3/8" width, 0.20 thickness.  It seems to be the appropriate wick.. if you don't mind, I'll PM  you some photos I just took of the candle.

The candles been in the bathroom for about 45 minutes and the scent is great.  It's not a large bathroom tho.. we just put it in our kitchen /dining area to see how it holds up and will report back in another hour, lol.

 

Filling several rooms if the goal.. maybe we need a thicker wick? Maybe 0.30 instead of 0.20?

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I use and love this wax!

You must cure it for weeks not days. Now some FOs will throw days after but in my experiences this wax benefits form a longer cure.

For me a minimum of 2 weeks. I know this can be a challenge as we all want an immediate HT as soon as we light up and you will with paraffin but coconut wax works a bit different.

There is a big learning curve using wooden wicks if you are a beginner. Maybe try traditional wicks first? Even those are challenging for the novice.🌸

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On 9/5/2019 at 7:56 PM, TheNovice said:

 

 

We really wanted to learn how to make strong, long-lasting natural candles.. but when we compare the hot throw to other brands such as Bath & Body Works who probably use more soy/parrafen blends, there really is just no comparision.  I guess also we're comparing larger 3-wick cotton wick candles to our single, 7oz wooden wick candle, but I'd figure I'd be able to just smell at least something. 

 

Is it just me? Am I just really bad at this, or are my expectations just completely not in line with what a vegetable wax will be able to provide? Our candle appears to be wicked perfectly and has a nice, beautiful flame that has a solid even melt pool in about 2 hours. Less than 1/2" deep.

 

Anyone have any tips?

 

Bath & Body Works does not use "natural" wax, they use paraffin. As does Yankee, BH&G (the Walmart brand), and many other retailers.

You are comparing apples to oranges.

Added to that, comapring a small single-wick candle's performance to a large multi-wick candle's is  like comparing a Honda Civic to a Dodge Charger. Sure, it's possible to trick out a Civic and drive it like you stole it, but you really have to know cars to make that happen. Just like you really have to know candles to get the most out of veggie waxes (and wood wicks). If you have your heart set on a veggie wax, I'd suggest trying an easier wick for now, until you have more experience. You can always go back to the wood wick later.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Sarah S said:

 

Bath & Body Works does not use "natural" wax, they use paraffin. As does Yankee, BH&G (the Walmart brand), and many other retailers.

You are comparing apples to oranges.

Added to that, comapring a small single-wick candle's performance to a large multi-wick candle's is  like comparing a Honda Civic to a Dodge Charger. Sure, it's possible to trick out a Civic and drive it like you stole it, but you really have to know cars to make that happen. Just like you really have to know candles to get the most out of veggie waxes (and wood wicks). If you have your heart set on a veggie wax, I'd suggest trying an easier wick for now, until you have more experience. You can always go back to the wood wick later.

 

 

 

 

Great points, and totally agree.  Do you have any recommendations for cotton wicks?

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