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Hot glue for wicks


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Hey there,

 

I know some of you are using hot glue to set your wicks.  I'm going to play around with this a bit and was wondering if any of you had any recommendations on what I should be looking for as far as temperature resistance goes.  Even better would be a link to a suitable product. :)

 

Thanks!

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I'm playing around with some of your designs (and thank you very much!) but I was actually looking at 4 oz tins.  I was working on my first top to bottom burns and it was looking like I was going to have a lot of wax left on the sides and in the corners at the bottom.  Was thinking about glue to lower the wick to give it a bit longer to burn and clean up that wax.  However, they burned *much* longer than I expected they were going to and cleaned themselves up by the time they were done.

 

I tried glueing some wicks in using some hot glue my wife had.  The minute I went to center them after the pour I ended up holding them in my hand at the glue didn't stand up to 170 very well.  That's why I was looking at high temp glue.  However, as the problem I was expecting didn't appear I'm just going to stick with what I was doing.

I'll let you know how things go with the centering device once I get it made.  If it works as well as it appears that it will it might be something you should consider marketing. Those centering devices that CS sells have limited functionality.  The manufacturer is supposedly willing to resize them but the emails I sent to the included address all bounced so I eventually ended up sizing it to the sizes I needed myself (yay, Dremel).

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I use the high temp glue. For tins the bottom I pour cooler so the wick don’t unstick. You don’t have to worry so much as clear glass with adhesion issues. I wick down on tins because they heat up. First two curbs there is hang up but then all melts lower down in tin.

i have a great heat gun from either Lowe’s or Home Depot you can’t miss it - it’s listed as fast heat up and it’s amazing.

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9 hours ago, xxxAlpha71xxx said:

I'm playing around with some of your designs (and thank you very much!) but I was actually looking at 4 oz tins.  I was working on my first top to bottom burns and it was looking like I was going to have a lot of wax left on the sides and in the corners at the bottom.  Was thinking about glue to lower the wick to give it a bit longer to burn and clean up that wax.  However, they burned *much* longer than I expected they were going to and cleaned themselves up by the time they were done.

 

I tried glueing some wicks in using some hot glue my wife had.  The minute I went to center them after the pour I ended up holding them in my hand at the glue didn't stand up to 170 very well.  That's why I was looking at high temp glue.  However, as the problem I was expecting didn't appear I'm just going to stick with what I was doing.

I'll let you know how things go with the centering device once I get it made.  If it works as well as it appears that it will it might be something you should consider marketing. Those centering devices that CS sells have limited functionality.  The manufacturer is supposedly willing to resize them but the emails I sent to the included address all bounced so I eventually ended up sizing it to the sizes I needed myself (yay, Dremel).

 

I bought this for $9 or $10 (tax included).

 

https://www.amazon.com/Glue-Gun-TopElek-Temperature-Projects/dp/B0776MFZ2W/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=hot+glue+gun&qid=1566959424&s=gateway&sr=8-5

 

I pour at 162-175 F or so.

 

1. I add a bit extra around the bottom so it kind of comes out past the bottom of the wick.

2. I apply a great deal of pressure to as well.

 

let it sit there for a minute to as well.

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I have used e6000 in clear that works great...like cement lol.

 

ETA the description:

 

Our most popular Craft adhesive – E6000 Craft – is known for its exceptional strength and toughness. It's versatile, flexible and adheres easily to most substrates. E6000 Bonds Everything So You Can Create Anything™. 
 

  • Bonds to glass, wood, plastics, tin, metal, ceramic, cement, rubber, vinyl, leather, fabric and much more 
  • Dries clear 
  • Photo safe 
  • Paintable 
  • Temperature resistant 
  • Non-flammable once cured
Edited by lovelyscents
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