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Bubble Issues - Wax Melts and Candles


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Hi Everyone,

 

Thanks for taking time to read my post.   I recently bought Golden Brands 464 Soy Wax and after about 6 different attempts I still ended up with tiny spiderweb bubbles in both my glass containers and plastic clamshells.  At first I thought it had something to do with my dye because I didn't notice it at first on my lighter dye colors, but all my wax melts/candles had the same issue.  I mixed in fragrances at ~185 (give or take a few degrees), removed my pour pot from the double boiler and mixed in my dyes and let rest to pour at ~140-135.  I've obviously done something wrong repeatedly, I just don't know what would cause these results.  Any help/feedback would be appreciated!  

 

Thanks!  ~Lin

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That is frosting not bubbles. Soy wax is prone to frosting and you will notice it more when using dyes. That’s why a lot of soy users do not dye their candles. 

 

I have not used 464, but there are a lot of users here. Maybe someone will chime in to offer any tips on how to lessen the frosting if possible. 

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Thanks you so much for the quick reply and explanation!  I had seen people mention frosting before but did not see a clear example of it.  That makes perfect sense!  I am new to Soy Wax and I also noticed that many others do not dye their Soy candles -  I thought perhaps it was to hide imperfections as you seem to confirm. 

 

I would like to dye my wax melts, but I can live with the small imperfections on those since they are not as noticeable.  Maybe someone can chime in on their solution to prevent frosting because I would like to make candles sans frosting ;)

 

Again thanks! 

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Hi @crescentridge and welcome to Craft Server, you'll find a lot of helpful people and great information here.

 

What Sebleo said about soy wax frosting is correct and I'll add to it. When I have made soy wax candles, I didn't dye them or did very pale pastel colors so the frosting wouldn't show. Some people on here have tricks for minimizing the frosting but I don't think you can completely eliminate it unless you do a very low percentage of soy in your wax blend. Do some searching on here for "frosting". There is nothing wrong with the frost, it's a natural characteristic of soy waxes and it doesn't effect scent throw or performance. Seems like you either love it and embrace it or you hate it and constantly fight it or avoid soy wax, LOL. It can be a selling point to show that your candles are actually made with Soy. 

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3 minutes ago, Laura C said:

Thanks for the warm welcome!  I have since read some ways to minimize the effects of frosting so I will try a few of the methods on my wax melts.  As far as my candles are concerned, I was leaning towards adding no dyes so this just helped me make up my mind.  I can definitely see the love/hate relationship with it after spending 3 days trying to get it just right! :) 

 

3 minutes ago, Laura C said:

 

 

Hi @crescentridge and welcome to Craft Server, you'll find a lot of helpful people and great information here.

 

What Sebleo said about soy wax frosting is correct and I'll add to it. When I have made soy wax candles, I didn't dye them or did very pale pastel colors so the frosting wouldn't show. Some people on here have tricks for minimizing the frosting but I don't think you can completely eliminate it unless you do a very low percentage of soy in your wax blend. Do some searching on here for "frosting". There is nothing wrong with the frost, it's a natural characteristic of soy waxes and it doesn't effect scent throw or performance. Seems like you either love it and embrace it or you hate it and constantly fight it or avoid soy wax, LOL. It can be a selling point to show that your candles are actually made with Soy. 

 

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When adding things to soy wax, keep in mind the total % of fo the wax can potentially hold also includes any other oils you are adding.

 

For instance, if a manufacturer (not retailer) states the wax is designed to hold say 10% of FO, and you add 8% FO plus 10% of another oil like coconut to combat frosting, etc., the total of oily additives in that candles is now 18%. What this means... greater potential for seepage, odd wax crystal performance, pockets of FO, pooling, etc. 

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1 hour ago, Karen Ov said:

Thanks for that info , I didn't think of that. I am new to this 5 months in. So for 1 pound of 464 and i would like to use 8% fo  how much coconut oil should i use ..I have seen anywhere from a 1/2 teaspoon per pound to  3 tablespoons...Thanks

I'd go to the manufacturer tech documents to see what they recommend for FO max and calculate from there based on weight.

 

Note that not all FO are as easily emulsified into the wax equally.  Some can get away with more, others less.

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