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Hello, 

I have been trying to make concrete candles and had an issue where the wax was falling out of the container if it is turned upside down. I have tried making a container without putting sealant on it to make it waterproof, and the wax doesn't fall out anymore, I have concluded the sealant was stopping the wax from adhering to the container. Id like to ask what sealant everyone else uses who put candles inside concrete containers?

 

This is the one i am currently using : 
https://boldmakerstudio.com/collections/tools-for-concrete/products/medium-gloss-concrete-sealer-concentrated-1-pint

 

Thanks!

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Have test burned candles without sealant? If the cement is thick enough it may not ever be an issue. I had to imagine that the wax fills certain pores in the cement, and then it’s a done deal. Have not tried its theoretical. 

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This is the challenge with cement containers and candles.  There are plenty of concrete sealants but finding one that won't seep into your melt pool when it heats up exposing you to god knows what fumes is a hurdle.  Without sealing you'll find that very often oil spots will appear on the outside as you burn the candle- and sometimes before.  I've made quite a few concrete

candles and some seeped a little, others did not.  But I pretty much stopped making them until I could figure out the sealant part..

 

 

Edited by pughaus
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On 7/5/2019 at 8:25 PM, CandleRush said:

Cement is porous so I think the sealant is the issue. You could seal the outside of the container but if you are having success I’d skip the sealant all together.

 

On 7/5/2019 at 9:02 PM, NightLight said:

Have test burned candles without sealant? If the cement is thick enough it may not ever be an issue. I had to imagine that the wax fills certain pores in the cement, and then it’s a done deal. Have not tried its theoretical. 

 

On 7/6/2019 at 12:09 AM, CaptnKush said:

Do not put it inside the jar, it is only for the outside. They use it to shine up the jar and make it look good, its also a sealant.

 

 

The problem is the dark rings on the outside

IMG_9035.jpg

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On 7/5/2019 at 10:44 PM, pughaus said:

This is the challenge with cement containers and candles.  There are plenty of concrete sealants but finding one that won't seep into your melt pool when it heats up exposing you to god knows what fumes is a hurdle.  Without sealing you'll find that very often oil spots will appear on the outside as you burn the candle- and sometimes before.  I've made quite a few concrete

 candles and some seeped a little, others did not.  But I pretty much stopped making them until I could figure out the sealant part..

 

 

Did you ever figure out what worked for you?

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Did you wash the jar out before you poured the wax? That pic looks like it might be Portland cement residue that might have still been lightly coated on inside of jar. Another thing you can do is message some of the people on Etsy that make those jars, maybe they can help you out better. Wow, I hope you get this one figured out because I love the look and price of those jars. Keep us posted.

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57 minutes ago, CaptnKush said:

Did you wash the jar out before you poured the wax? That pic looks like it might be Portland cement residue that might have still been lightly coated on inside of jar. Another thing you can do is message some of the people on Etsy that make those jars, maybe they can help you out better. Wow, I hope you get this one figured out because I love the look and price of those jars. Keep us posted.

I am very sure that i did, but ill try with another container i have and just make sure. 

 

Thanks!

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3 hours ago, ChadTaljaardt said:

 

 

The problem is the dark rings on the outside

 

is the ring around the wax inside a problem?  I've been selling paddywax cement candles for years and no one cares, nor even mentions the interior of the vessel appearance..   it's concrete after all, not ceramic and some porosity is inherent in the material. 

But any oil spots on the outside of the container are a concern and look really messy. 
 

I have spoken to makers of another popular candle line that uses terracotta containers and they have been using a mineral oil soak to help decrease seepage.  Apparently it works according to them, although it does somewhat darken the container.  I haven't tested this method myself thoroughly, I wiped some down but didn't have enough min oil on hand to do a full soak.

I'm not sure if it really helps to seal the concrete or if it just hides the oil stains ;)

 

 

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Nice looking container!

Yesterday while shopping I noticed cement vessels with candles in them. It looked like they had a tiny gap all the way around for what that’s worth.

I would use a sealer that is specifically for concrete, only the outside. But keep us posted if you’ve come up with anything.

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37 minutes ago, CandleRush said:

Yup, bet that’s it!

 

Needs to cure!

 

 

Unfortunately, the length of cure did nothing for me.  Doesn't matter how long it cures, it's a porous material and the oil will still seep in and stain it. 

Just like it does on a driveway or garage floor.
 

RE: sealing the outside, that helps it from getting dirty from handling and fingerprints, but any oil that seeps from the inside>out will still be visible, you just end up with oil spots that are now sealed in. :(

 

Edited by pughaus
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4 hours ago, ChadTaljaardt said:

I tried washing it and poring the wax again to no avail, i also let it stay melted for a longer time to see how the concrete held up, and the results were bad. 

 

I'll try mineral oil next. 

 

IMG_8355.thumb.jpg.ec0667c7e78627413febb184981d41d0.jpgIMG_2932.thumb.jpg.46e30119367d05f49128a4fe221c465b.jpg

try coating the interior with water based modpodge   https://www.amazon.com/Mod-Podge-Waterbase-16-Ounce-CS11302/dp/B001IKES5O   it's the least toxic, easy to source, solution I could find.  It helps keep the oil from penetrating to the outside.( most of the time)  It does melt into the wax a bit but I didn't notice any effect on the candle performance or appearance the few times I used it.

But I could feel the modpodge getting moist and melty as the candle burned.  There are also fireplace concrete sealants that can hold up to heat, hopefully without any toxic fumes, but that needs further research and they are not easy to find, much less purchase in small qtys.  

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From what I have gathered, cheng sealant can be used outside and inside a cement vessel. However, it's really expensive for a 500ml sealant - $30. 

I have not tried it myself yet, but I think that is the best option as is it non-toxic, food-safe, etc.. 

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So glad I found this page, I've been trialing using a plaster for casting candle containers and have exactly this issue. I was going to try waterproof PVA (I'm in the UK so I think that's modgepodge in the US). I'm using coconut wax which has a low melt point so the result is total discolouration as it melts. I shall update you on the trial!  I'd post a pic but I can't work out how to do that.... 

16105592441521222459556162201453.jpg

Edited by Kass
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