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Any of you 4630 users also tried 4627? If so, is there any difference other than one is slab form? I currently love 4627 for both candles by itself and mixing with soy. Jar adhesion and scent throw is the best, but I am kinda getting tired of scooping out of the box.

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I prefer 4630 for two main reasons....it's much easier to deal with (less messy) and for me it's easier to wick.  I think the 4627 produces more soot, but maybe that could be fined tuned with wicking???  IDK.  I use zincs.
The downside to 4630 is I cannot eliminate wet spots.  And they are clusters of tiny wet spots, which looks worse IMO than a couple of large ones.  I could deal with normal wet spots.  They both throw very well.  I don't note any major differences in that department with the scents I tested.  I've only gone through one box of 4627, and I didn't like it enough to move forward.

 

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Hmmm. Well I have never gotten soot from the 4627 unless the candle was melted mid point or lower in jar and the wick was dancing or I didn't trim the wick. I still get the wet spots like you describe but not often. They are little tiny bubbles .  I only seem to get them in the mason jars right below the lid threads and but not in the tumblers. I have been pouring anywhere between 160-180 with heated jars. Htp is my wick of choice, sometimes lx for the 4627.

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Never used 4627.....mainly because I am happy with the results I get with 4630  

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On 6/8/2019 at 7:37 AM, CaptnKush said:

Any of you 4630 users also tried 4627? If so, is there any difference other than one is slab form? I currently love 4627 for both candles by itself and mixing with soy. Jar adhesion and scent throw is the best, but I am kinda getting tired of scooping out of the box.

I've used both to blend with various soys. I prefer 4627. I love the look of the end product better. The adhesion is awesome, and I rarely have any cracking when it's cooler outside. I am intrigued that 4627 can be so soft, but hold up to the high temps.

I tried both of them without soy, but I'm not a big fan of 100% paraffin. The FOs take on a different smell to me in 100% paraffin. So I stick with using 4627 as a blending wax. 

 

Here is how I make 4627 easier to handle. I cut the top off the plastic, then use a blow dryer (heat gun melts the plastic) to heat all the extra wax on the sides of the plastic into the wax block. Then warm the package away from the block, on all sides. Then cut the plastic all the way down, to have access to the wax. I use a very firm drywall knife to cut the wax. I have very little mess or waste with this technique. It's a little more prep time doing this routine, but it eliminates battling with a mess every time I make candles, and it goes quicker than it sounds.  

 

Also, I like 4627 better because it never changes consistency. I used 4630 for many years in my wax blend. I never knew if I was going to get a soft batch or a hard batch each time I ordered. And I always wondered if that was messing with my burns. 

 

Edited by Jeana
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On 6/18/2019 at 9:08 PM, Jeana said:

 

I tried both of them without soy, but I'm not a big fan of 100% paraffin. The FOs take on a different smell to me in 100% paraffin. So I stick with using 4627 as a blending wax. 

 

 

Interesting how different our noses/senses can be.  I think soy gets a weird undertone to it over time whereas my straight paraffin never does even years later, stays true to the oils.  I always thought it was because soy was veggie based but shows it's just a opinion that varies like everything else.

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I use the 4627 by itself and mix a little with soy to fix frosting and that lumpy look you can sometimes get. 4627 I use mostly by itself for anything that isn't a bakery scent, because Soy for some reason makes Bakery scents almost seem like you can taste them, it gives it a thick scent which is great.

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1 minute ago, CaptnKush said:

 Soy for some reason makes Bakery scents almost seem like you can taste them, it gives it a thick scent which is great.

This I can agree with initially but then I have problems as the soy ages....maybe it is the soy I chose or my methods 🤷‍♀️

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