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What happened here? I'm having continuing problems with 444 and 464 wax. The photos you see here were left to cool slowly overnight on their own. The ambient temperature when I left them for the night was 92F at 8:19 PM, and the humidity was 36% (low humidity for my area). I'm getting these results with this wax more often than not. The tops look dried out and have a rippled, cracked appearance. The tops appear similar to a severe case of chapped lips. I didn't pour too hot. Pouring was done SLOWLY at 135F or less. 

Wax: GW 444

Heated to 190+ and added dye, then stirred for a full two minutes.

Added 12% fragrance at 185F, then stirred for a full two minutes.

I let the wax stand until it cooled to 135F, and then I poured.

 

If this is the way these two waxes are supposed to look, then I can live with it or is there something I'm missing here?

 

20190602_090358.jpg

20190602_090332.jpg

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8 hours ago, TallTayl said:

Def try lower FO. 

 

Believe it or not, they hay have cooled too slowly. Various additives in those waxes have different drop points. 

I wondered about that. The candles stayed in my garage workshop all night, and it never gets cool if it's heated up all day. Now that I think of it, this type of problem wasn't so frequent back in the winter, when the garage was heated by a wall heater about 15 feet away. Please translate: "Def try lower FO."

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Translation: Definitely try lower fo. 🤣 

 

try cooling the hot pot of wax with a fan before pouring. Stir often to keep it smooth. It’s what I need to do in summer months when wax melters are hot all the time . 

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8 hours ago, TallTayl said:

Def try lower FO. 

 

Believe it or not, they hay have cooled too slowly. Various additives in those waxes have different drop points. 

I wondered about that. The candles stayed in my garage workshop all night, and it never gets cool if it's heated up all day. Now that I think of it, this type of problem wasn't so frequent back in the winter, when the garage was heated by a wall heater about 15 feet away. Please translate: "Def try lower FO."

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10 hours ago, NightLight said:

That’s crazy looking. Ok try an experiment. I have better luck with 464 pouring hot.

Dig out wax and pour 170, 160, 150. See results.

Can this wax be salvaged? 

10 hours ago, NightLight said:

That’s crazy looking.

You should see it in real life. It looks somewhat like Zombie skin. 

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10 hours ago, NightLight said:

That’s crazy looking. Ok try an experiment. I have better luck with 464 pouring hot.

Dig out wax and pour 170, 160, 150. See results.

I was using 444 not 464, but they're pretty much the same thing aren't they?

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Here's the good news on my hot and cold garage shop: In about two weeks I'm having a building constructed behind my garage. It will be wired with sockets all over the place, insulated walls, 48 feet of shelving, and best of all, a through the wall A/C and heat unit. An LED lighting system will cover the ceiling, hang over the workbench, and under the top row of shelves. The lower level of shelves will be at countertop level at the same height as the workbench. That will create a horseshoe-shaped assembly line sort of operation. I'll be close enough to connect to the Wi-Fi in the house and will have an intercom so I can continue to monitor my 93-year-old father. I'm his caretaker. There will be a computer in there to access my formulas, notes and other information.  Maybe, just maybe, I'll be able to reach the wireless printer. That way I can produce labels while waiting for things to cool down or heat up. This arrangement will also give me the ability to jump into this forum and get information plus watch YouTube videos on candle making. An added benefit is that I can watch my favorite college football team have another losing season and end up in the cellar of the SEC again. If any of you have some refreshing suggestions as to what else I can put in there, please let me know. I might put an 8-track stereo system in as well.:rockon: 

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I think those “wrinkles” on your wax could be thanks to the heat emanating from the foil above it. In fact, the wax wrinkles look exactly like tinfoil ripples. As the wax was cooling (and therefore shrinking a bit) the wrinkled heat areas caused the candle to solidify unevenly.

No more tinfoil hats for candles :)

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2 minutes ago, candlesinflorida said:

I think those “wrinkles” on your wax could be thanks to the heat emanating from the foil above it. In fact, the wax wrinkles look exactly like tinfoil ripples. As the wax was cooling (and therefore shrinking a bit) the wrinkled heat areas caused the candle to solidify unevenly.

No more tinfoil hats for candles :)

Didn't think of it that way. Yes, the aluminum foil tent in 92 F temperatures was pretty stupid on my part. 

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Btw I always use  12% FO with 464 (and now 444 too) and have never had kooky tops like those. Once in a while if I am lazy about stirring, the tops will be a tiny bit mottled or have a tiny little divot. But not anywhere near the grand canyon situation you’ve got going in those pics. Pretty sure it was the reflected heat. 

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Just now, Quentin said:

Didn't think of it that way. Yes, the aluminum foil tent in 92 F temperatures was pretty stupid on my part. 

I bet that those orange wrinkles are MIRROR images of your tinfoil wrinkles.

 

(...hmmm maybe I should be wearing the tinfoil hat lol)

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I am so envious of your new building!!!  I have a small building I can clean up for candle making. But I have to get it rewired and it’s not as close to the house as I’d like. 

 

Congratulations to you!!

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3 hours ago, Quentin said:

Can this wax be salvaged? 

You should see it in real life. It looks somewhat like Zombie skin. 

 

Will it still burn well? If so, now you have discovered how to make Walking Dead themed candles!!  Yessssss!!!!!

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17 hours ago, Quentin said:

Maybe, just maybe, I'll be able to reach the wireless printer. That way I can produce labels while waiting for things to cool down or heat up.

If it doesn't reach your printer, you could always try an extender. Plug it in somewhere between your router/modem, printer and computer and it will extend your WiFi signal..  Otherwise you get get an inexpensive printer BUT buy your cartridges on Amazon.  My orignal  Canon cartridges cost $199 (Cdn) for a set.... now I buy 5 sets for about $40. on Amazon.

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444/ coconut wax 50/50. FO 6%, I think. You can't really see the color accurately, but it was natural colored wax that discolored to yellow, then brown after several burns.  This picture doesn't really do it justice.

 

This is after it I made it all pretty, poked relief holes, heat gunned, cured and burned it a few times.  It set up that way after one of the burns. 

 

It's 444, man.  (But great throw 🙃)

IMG_20180913_211714.jpg

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@Jenni Wix my 50/50 coconut/444 blend looked just like that after the first burn. I noticed that I got some discoloration with that blend as well, but I think it was because my wick was too big. I'm going to nix using that much soy and probably go with another ratio. For me, I think 50% of soy is too much and gives it the typical soy look because there is already soy in my coconut wax, so I'm going to try 90/10 coconut/soy and 85/15 coconut/soy.

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I’m not sure what to say here. Maybe it’s the 444 wax? 

Some of you know I blend 464 with Lab co or Northwoods coconut wax, 50/50 for a year now and have never had bad results. Smooth tops, no holes, smooth after each burn to the end.I have tried 464 at higher percentages with the coconut wax and they were ugly which is why i use 50/50. 

Recap: When I upped the soy they got ugly. One soys characteristics is bumpy tops after you burn. So I would try lowering your percentage.

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23 hours ago, Jenni Wix said:

444/ coconut wax 50/50. FO 6%, I think. You can't really see the color accurately, but it was natural colored wax that discolored to yellow, then brown after several burns.  This picture doesn't really do it justice.

 

This is after it I made it all pretty, poked relief holes, heat gunned, cured and burned it a few times.  It set up that way after one of the burns. 

 

It's 444, man.  (But great throw 🙃)

IMG_20180913_211714.jpg

Our candles are twinning. mine looks just like that after one burn today...I couldn't figure out what I did wrong. Normally I use 464 but decided to switch it up and get 444. Hmmm.

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