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On 5/16/2019 at 7:33 AM, TallTayl said:

 

 

Soy (and other natural waxes) do contain a range of moisture. Some cases you open and they feel noticeably wet, while others are crispy and dry. This throws off wicking really badly.  I’m sitting here frustrated that it happened again, with C1 this time. My new cases are initially several sizes off from my last lot. 😖🙈 I will need to age this wax a few months to see if that changes (which I suspect it will).

 

 

This is so frustrating to hear, as I have been testing C-1. Anyway:

 

I think it was you, a while back, that said something about tempering the wax to get the moisture out. Is this correct? Would that work for your current situation with C1?

 

Also, like it’s been asked, what time point do you wick for if the wax continues to change as it cures? Do you wick for 2 or 6 months and let that much inventory sit around before you sell?  Or do you still sell it, say, at 3-4 weeks just knowing it will only burn better as it ages?

 

Thats my confusion. If the candle is going to burn differently as it ages, then at what point do you sell it? Am I overthinking it? 

 

Some people are saying you you will find in say 6 months it needs to be wicked up or down. Well, seems you have a choice to make. Wick for now and sell quick, hoping they burn it soon. Or wick for later and sit on tons of inventory for a few months. And, if that’s the case, how do you expand to a larger scale with that kind of business model?

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On 5/12/2019 at 6:36 PM, candlesinflorida said:

Thanks everyone! I started experimenting with one 10 lb bag of paraffin wax, just to see if the scent throw was possibly anything particularly exciting. In my experience, it wasn't. But I was wondering if shipping from overseas/shelf life was a big factor. Thx for the input :)

 

 

Like anything else it takes time and experience to make a great scented and safe candle. Take your time. If you've just started experimenting with paraffin how do you know what works and what doesn't? Its hard to get all that out of just one 10 lb bag. Don't judge a wax until you know it inside and out. Paraffin wax will make an excellent scented candle if you learn how to work with it.

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4 hours ago, Candybee said:

 

Like anything else it takes time and experience to make a great scented and safe candle. Take your time. If you've just started experimenting with paraffin how do you know what works and what doesn't? Its hard to get all that out of just one 10 lb bag. Don't judge a wax until you know it inside and out. Paraffin wax will make an excellent scented candle if you learn how to work with it.

Good advice.

I started out with soy wax about 4 years ago...then about three years ago, I tried to see what the fuss was all about with paraffin and bought a few different brands. It was all a big fail. Maybe I did it all wrong back then.

So now that I am a more of an experienced chandler...I thought I would re-visit paraffin. I imagine that there are better choices than the ones I have used. But I am also a bit concerned with the health issues of breathing in petroleum. I don't want to start a whole paraffin controversy thread-and I have no scientific info. at hand...and maybe I would be ok with the unknown risks, if paraffin were way, way better than soy for me. Maybe I should just stick with soy/coconut/apricot...although I keep wondering if paraffin has better CT and HT and I might be missing out!

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There are many positives using paraffin. Look for those articles online, they are helpful. candles.org for one. Studies have shown all waxes are subject soot. If paraffin wax was hazardous we’d all be sick. If anything fragrance oil may cause issues more than wax IMO but research also shows this. But the amounts of fragrances is pretty small over all. 

Sometimes I wonder about soy and all the pesticides in it. Is it any safer? I’m sure they clean and refine wax. Maybe someone else has more scientific thoughts about this.

I personally don’t buy into all the hazardous health claims and hype. There might be some different opinions here I’m sure. 

It will be fun to research and try it🌸

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Well, I sure hope there aren’t terrible effects. But I do think that a level of skepticism is wise. Often, health issues take years to develop. Could take over a decade. And the home candle making business us a relatively new phenomenon (less than 20 years) so it might be too early to conclude that there are zero health effects. Plus, some people have predispositions to developing cancers...and so little, in general, is known about environmental causes and cancer. Who would fund all that research...the petroleum companies? Not!

Good point about the pesticides.

in any case, I try to put aside the thoughts of risk and enjoy the process anyway...just impt issues to keep in mind, on the back burner. (Literally!) 

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Making any candles using any wax can play havoc on your health especially when you use FOs and additives. The easy way to avoid lung health issues is to always wear a respirator when making candles.

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Have you ever noticed that most of the time scary articles are written by someone trying to sell us something? 

 

Anyway, thought I’d share this gem. 

4FA08DD5-69F9-4A83-8BE6-DBA34CCECC1F.jpeg

bought it at Aldi (a chain grocery store) a few months ago for about $6.  Lit it, and it was severely under wicked. The melt pool was smaller than a tea light and it was nearly self extinguishing within an hour.  Stuck an HTP 83 in it. I power burn so just lit and let go. Never trimmed it.  The melt pool was roughly the size of a votive through the entire first 2/3 of the large candle.. resisted the urge to wick up and am really glad I did.  It smells so strong and clean every burn. Never any soot. Scent wafts into several rooms easily. The thick hang up wept into the melt pool, meaning every single burn was as pure and strongly scented as the last. I’m in the last inch or so now, and the sides are cleaning up very well.  I suspect I’ll get at least 30 - 40 more hours with it. 

C9F46FE5-5BA7-4F84-8877-FD939F1C5174.jpeg

 

 

I wish like heck I knew what wax this is. It was made in India, so no clue what it could possibly be. Paraffin of some variety.  It was hard enough to pop out of the glass when I bought it and re-wicked. Not squishy like 4627 or 4630.  Not translucent and hard (or dirty)  like 4786.  Just a perfect candle wax in every way. I would switch in a hot second if I knew what it was. 

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It’s taken this long for me to see the writing on the wall as far as my wax choices!

 

The last few days Ive been burning candles from February. These are Flamings Pro Blend 600 wax which is just about 50/50 soy and paraffin.

 

Both ct and ht are fantastic! Pineapple cilantro, which is on the strong side anyway and Asian sandlewood which is lighter generally but strong in this wax. I also have Asian sandlewood in my coconut wax blend which has barely no scent at all.

 

I feel I’ve given coconut wax and soy a fair try but now I’d like to use straight paraffin and some paraffin  blends. 🌸

 

 

 

 

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