Jump to content
bktolbert

Coconut oil doesn't improve my scent throw

Recommended Posts

Based on the internet, I thought coconut oil would improve the throw of my soy candles. However, after testing and testing (and testing), my conclusions are 

  1. any soy candle with more than 20% coconut oil is simply too mushy and takes forever to "dry"
  2. coconut oil does not noticeably improve the throw

 

In fact, I prefer the scents of my all-soy candles to candles with coconut oil. Nonetheless, I will continue to use a small percentage of coconut oil <5% in my candles because it does improve the appearance of tops (makes the hard glaze look of soy smoother/creamier).

 

So, if you're new to candle making like me and are thinking coconut oil is a miracle cure to poor scent throw... don't let your high expectations disappoint you. Some fragrances just aren't meant for soy.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for sharing this. Those were similar to my observations.

 

Soybean wax is so unstable on its own that coconut oil only makes things worse.

 

I actually prefer paraffin in soy to Coconut as it is a lot more predictable as well.

 

Did you also find the coconut oil and soy wax makes it more prone to soot?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a coconut wax formula. I have no soot with my candles. The reason to use coconut oil with soy is it’s an all natural alternative paraffin. In all my versions using coconut oil it does help with burn with soy and you get a meltpool faster, which equals faster throw of scent.

Soybean Oil I would never use as it would be prone to rancidity, and soybean oil gone off is yucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TallTayl said:

Thank you for sharing this. Those were similar to my observations.

 

Soybean wax is so unstable on its own that coconut oil only makes things worse.

 

I actually prefer paraffin in soy to Coconut as it is a lot more predictable as well.

 

Did you also find the coconut oil and soy wax makes it more prone to soot?

At this moment, I can't justify paraffin when there are more sustainable alternatives for the environment.

 

I've not seen a ton of soot in either all-soy or coconut-blended, but my candles without coconut oil have noticeably less carbon buildup.

 

53 minutes ago, NightLight said:

I have a coconut wax formula. I have no soot with my candles. The reason to use coconut oil with soy is it’s an all natural alternative paraffin. In all my versions using coconut oil it does help with burn with soy and you get a meltpool faster, which equals faster throw of scent.

Soybean Oil I would never use as it would be prone to rancidity, and soybean oil gone off is yucky.

You might get a faster throw with coconut oil because of its low melting point, but I don't think it throws better. I actually haven't tested the speed. I usually just test ~1, 2, and 3 hour. Interesting idea!

 

I just wanted to put it out there for new folks that a regular soy candle isn't inferior to a soy candle with coconut oil in terms of smell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you referring to Coconut Oil?? Or coconut wax??   For fun, I tried blending some coconut oil (is used for cooking, but looks like a wax) with some Millenium soy 20/80.  The tops looked like swiss cheese, although it didn't burn that bad...and I didn't notice any improvement in hot throw.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Gary in Canada said:

Are you referring to Coconut Oil?? Or coconut wax??  

 

What's the difference?   If you're talking about a 100% coconut product and not one of the many mystery blends currently being marketed as "Coconut wax" ...


You can buy 100% Coconut Wax , a soft, white, solid from Cargill composed of Hydrogenated coconut glycerides" with a MP of appx 90-102 degrees or you can buy Coconut Oil 92, a soft white solid, from a soap supplier like Bulk Apothecary composed of  Hydrogenated coconut glycerides with a MP of appx 92 degrees.   If there's a difference between those 2 products, aside from the name, I can't tell what it is. 

I blend 100%  coconut oil (or wax, if you prefer)  with soy -  the soy used and the ratio of coco:soy take some tweaking to get good results for sure.  It's not a magic bullet.  Too much coco does not a better candle make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hydrogenated coconut oil is NOT a wax and anyone thinking that they can use it to make a candle alone is wrong. All coconut wax candles are blends how you make it or buy it is up to you. Like soy it has its own set of problems of adding too much or less in your blend.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hydrogenated coconut oil is NOT a wax and anyone thinking that they can use it to make a candle alone is wrong. All coconut wax candles are blends how you make it or buy it is up to you. Like soy it has its own set of problems of adding too much or less in your blend.

 

You can use coconut oil to help your blend burn faster easier. I use if I am stuck between two wicks, for example a wick almost perfect but not reaching edge of glass. Add coconut oil and it can help with that instead of wicking up one size that you know is going to be too big.

 

Coconut oil takes longer to harden. Not mushy just very slow solidifying, well mushy if you have added waaaay to much.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here’s where I see the use of “wax” as appropriate... 

 

soy “wax” is simply hydrogenated soy bean oil.  Companies refine and hydrogenate a base “wax” to different degrees for their final end product.  Makes soy “wax” like midwest soy and 415 are kind of terrible without additives, but they are still insidered a “wax”.

 

jojoba oil is technically considered a “wax” though it is a liquid that looks like any other oil on my shelf. 

 

Coconut oil 76 is an oil solid at 76*F or lower.  Coconut 92 is partially hydrogenated to raise the melt point to 92*F or thereabouts. The food industry calls it an oil or a wax for whatever end purpose they have, but that does not mean it will perform like other hydrogenated oils.

 

coconut oil 92 - I totally agree - is terrible alone as a modern container candle fuel. It’s not durable for the end product “we” think of in a “solid” wax container candle and would need to be described very differently to end customers to set expectations. Though when you think about it, olive oil and other liquids are candle fuels around the globe and have been for thousands of years. 

 

When adding coconut 92 to soy “wax” a lot of unpredictable things can happen. American Soy suggested adding 10% “high melt coconut” to improve the throw of their midwest soy wax product.  Result: kind of a messy candle.  That naked wax is not designed to hold that much oil so it leaked. I suppose I Could go down the rabbit hole of additives to stabilize, but “why”? 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...