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Forrest

Photographing products for on-line sales

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In another thread TT suggested I should write an article about photographing our products, and while I have some basic knowledge in this area, unless you’re selling grandchildren or sunsets my experience is limited. So to build on my knowledge base I did a little research, and I found this excellent article on Etsy’s site. Not being one to reinvent the wheel I thought I would post this here. Also this is just one part of ETSY’s Seller Handbook which contains information on many other subjects that would be helpful to anyone wanting to sell on-line.

 

https://www.etsy.com/seller-handbook/article/the-ultimate-guide-to-product/143986679284

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Funny you posted this.  I have been watching my etsy site, my sales are way up from last year.  The biggest thing I changed was my pictures.  Last spring I bought a "photo Studio" on amazon and some wood like back drops.  Then then to Michael's and bought some props.  I spent like $200 total. Plus I had an empty bedroom.  LOL

 

I was making a new website (online store) for myself and decided I need to get some good pictures and needed specific ones for certain parts of my website.  So with a little help from my girlfriend we started playing around.  I needed something that as I added product I could easily reproduce to keep things consistent.

 

 

Last 30 Day Stats compared to same time last year.

 

I was paying for Ad's on Etsy but I am not any more. I was paying last year, not this year.

 

Total Views Up 65%

Visits Up 50%

Orders Up 130%

Revenue Up 134%

 

The way I interpret those stats is that

 

Yes more people as seeing my items, BUT WAY more are actually buying them.  

My descriptions really did not change,  my titles did not change. Tags did get tweeked a little. I did raise my prices from last year.  I always had good reviews.

I have to attribute this to the new pictures.

 

 

My old pics weren't bad,  but far from good.    Do a search on Etsy and I bet if you find good pictures they also have good amount of sales. 

 

FYI - This is my 4th Christmas Season on Etsy

 

 

 

 

studio.thumb.jpg.aae4d0aaa9092a66d3c090aa468715d0.jpg

 

bc5.thumb.jpg.deb8497adf53b8b9557a7c8d7e203c17.jpg

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On 12/4/2018 at 1:47 PM, Forrest said:

In another thread TT suggested I should write an article about photographing our products, and while I have some basic knowledge in this area, unless you’re selling grandchildren or sunsets my experience is limited. So to build on my knowledge base I did a little research, and I found this excellent article on Etsy’s site. Not being one to reinvent the wheel I thought I would post this here. Also this is just one part of ETSY’s Seller Handbook which contains information on many other subjects that would be helpful to anyone wanting to sell on-line.

 

 

 

https://www.etsy.com/seller-handbook/article/the-ultimate-guide-to-product/143986679284

 

Very timely information. It just so happens that this is a big project that I'm struggling with right now. I'm trying to get pictures ready to put on my online store. I'm not a good photographer. Shaky hands, a miniature tripod of sorts, a cell phone, and a webcam plugged into my computer are the only things I have to work with now. It was comforting to read the comments from the other Etsy users and realize I'm not alone in all this. Getting the lighting right without glare is the biggest hurdle for me. You're right about the handbook. Browsing through it I found lots of good information that can be used regardless of whether you're using Etsy or something else.

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7 minutes ago, Quentin said:

 Getting the lighting right without glare is the biggest hurdle for me.

A light box would help with that, and they are easy to build.

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Just now, Forrest said:

A light box would help with that, and they are easy to build.

I just noticed the part on the DIY light box. I think I could pull that off.

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4 hours ago, MilosCandles said:

Funny you posted this.  I have been watching my etsy site, my sales are way up from last year.  The biggest thing I changed was my pictures.  Last spring I bought a "photo Studio" on amazon and some wood like back drops.  Then then to Michael's and bought some props.  I spent like $200 total. Plus I had an empty bedroom.  LOL

 

I was making a new website (online store) for myself and decided I need to get some good pictures and needed specific ones for certain parts of my website.  So with a little help from my girlfriend we started playing around.  I needed something that as I added product I could easily reproduce to keep things consistent.

 

 

Last 30 Day Stats compared to same time last year.

 

I was paying for Ad's on Etsy but I am not any more. I was paying last year, not this year.

 

Total Views Up 65%

Visits Up 50%

Orders Up 130%

Revenue Up 134%

 

The way I interpret those stats is that

 

Yes more people as seeing my items, BUT WAY more are actually buying them.  

My descriptions really did not change,  my titles did not change. Tags did get tweeked a little. I did raise my prices from last year.  I always had good reviews.

I have to attribute this to the new pictures.

 

 

My old pics weren't bad,  but far from good.    Do a search on Etsy and I bet if you find good pictures they also have good amount of sales. 

 

FYI - This is my 4th Christmas Season on Etsy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your experience matches what Etsy said in one of the articles, clearly presentation is the key to online sales. BTW, nice pictures.

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18 hours ago, MilosCandles said:

bc5.thumb.jpg.deb8497adf53b8b9557a7c8d7e203c17.jpg

 

I wanted to point out how Milos managed to use an interesting background while still keeping the product as the main focus. That’s the tricky part. It makes your picture interesting while drawing your attention to the product. This picture also gives you context so that you have an idea how large the product is. This makes the customers comfortable that they know what they are getting. If you read MilosCandles’ post above you can see how these things helped improve sales, so it is well worth the effort.

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