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lightmyfire

Something that I read that changed my candle making life!

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I was on a crafting site a few weeks ago (I cannot for the life of me remember what it was) and I was searching for information about sink holes and how to avoid them.  I've been making candles for about 4 years so I'm getting the hang of this and I'm always reading threads here- I've learned a lot over the years about pouring temps, etc. 

 

Now this may be something ya'll already know, but the tip I read that has changed my life is that if you are using a jar that changes shape at the top, stop your pour before you get to that narrowing.  I have added 8 oz square masons to my lineup just for seasonal scents (I only use 9 and 16 oz amber straight sided jars--keeps my life as simple as possible!) and I was read to pull my hair out due to sink holes on every candle, every pour.  It was driving me insane.  After I read the tip I mentioned, I stopped pouring right where the flared square part of the jar narrows to the neck.  Voila.  No more sink holes.  I can tell when I've poured just a bit too far because I will get a sink hole; easy to fix with the heat gun as soon as I see it.  It sure beats fixing every dang one of them.  

 

 

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I dunno about that.  Soy wax can be a finicky mistress. Poke around under the surface of your next bunch of candles and see if it holds true,  ive had sink holes/cavities in many containers at different pour levels. The only way they stay at bay in my shop is by managing pour temps and rate of cooling.

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2 hours ago, TallTayl said:

I dunno about that.  Soy wax can be a finicky mistress. Poke around under the surface of your next bunch of candles and see if it holds true,  ive had sink holes/cavities in many containers at different pour levels. The only way they stay at bay in my shop is by managing pour temps and rate of cooling.

Well I do manage them with pour temps and as for rate of cooling I wrap each candle in a felt wrap to slow the cooling.  I still do that.  I do all of that, believe me.  But as an added precaution I don't pour past the narrowing of the jar.  It's just another step.  

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Very interesting as I use the square masons and with 444 I still get sink holes and giant cavities filling just to level before the neck and it happens at various pour temps and cooling rates 

A few I thought were perfect I poked just to be sure thinking I hit the golden ticket on temps and down both sides of the wick I had complete air all the way down 🤷‍♀️

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my tip wasn't intended to be a panacea, merely a suggestion on something to add to your considerations when pouring a candle in a jar with a neck that's narrower than the jar.  That's all.  :2cents: 

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13 minutes ago, moonshine said:

I appreciate that I really do 

I’m just puzzled why it hasn’t worked for me 😂

I added this technique to lowering my pour temps way down on my 6006 and it has worked well.  I just poured 6 of the 9 oz straight sided amber jars and as a test I poured at 160 instead of 155 and I went past the point where the neck narrows and I have sink holes on every candle.  The combo of lower temp and fill point just seem to be a happy combo in my studio.  :02:

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I wonder if the altitude or elevation one is in makes a difference? Not only with the air pockets and sink holes but with everything; scent throw, wicking, jar adhesion, etc.?

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20 minutes ago, Laura C said:

I wonder if the altitude or elevation one is in makes a difference? Not only with the air pockets and sink holes but with everything; scent throw, wicking, jar adhesion, etc.?

I would think it would be like baking.......I had to adjust every cake recipe for the altitude when I lived in Denver.  Not so much in Texas :D

But at some point I guess I realized that this craft is what it is...........I think sometimes there's just no explanation.  I have strengthened my intestinal fortitude immensely.

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