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4630 glass adhesion/wet spots

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I know customers don't care about these, but after my transition to 4630, I'm having real issues with many, small wet spots on some 8 oz jars.  This last go around, I tried pouring hotter (170F or so), and covering the two test candles with a box to help insulate it.  Definitely fewer wet spots, but still enough to be noticeable.  Is this all about cooling rate?  I work in my basement (it is summer though), so should I run a portable heater down to my work room and heat the room up?  The other side is, should I pour a lot cooler to minimize the amount of cooling needed before solidification?  I'm surprised how many wet spots I have with this wax compared to the soy wax I used previously.  

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This isn't a wax I've used, but I've read a bit about it as it looks like a nice wax for me to try out one day.  I would try warming the container and doing what you're already doing to cool slowly.

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You are doing nothing wrong.......I live in AZ where the average temps are HIGH...no matter what temp I pour my 4630 candles at, I still get some wet spots...more in the winter than the summer.  I have tried pouring at various temps, cooling in various ways, (box over candles) and initially the candles come out perfect but after they have been stored for a few days, those friggin wet spots appear.  So I have decided to NOT worry about the wet spots....if I pull a candle out of storage that has wet spots, I hit it with the heat gun and eliminate them........the wet spots DO NOT effect the burn of the candle and should not be an embarrassment to the candle maker.

So, my advise to you is to NOT worry about the wet spots but focus on the HT of the candle......after all, that is what the general public is interested in.........the scent throw.

4630 is a quality wax for containers......wet spots or not...it is the best that I have used.

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It is amazing how many crop up after a day or two!!  I know it doesn't affect the burn, but they definitely draw the eye to them.  This wax must just love to shrink over time.  

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22 minutes ago, Paintguru said:

It is amazing how many crop up after a day or two!!  I know it doesn't affect the burn, but they definitely draw the eye to them.  This wax must just love to shrink over time.  

and the question at hand 'is ''does the general public'' even notice?

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36 minutes ago, Pam W said:

and the question at hand 'is ''does the general public'' even notice?

I doubt that they do lol.

I rarely had wet spots when i used this wax.only on a few fo it would hzppen to,and i to would just hit it with thd heat gun

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At this point in time, I'd be more concerned in producing a quality candle than focusing on the wet spots.

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8 hours ago, Pam W said:

At this point in time, I'd be more concerned in producing a quality candle than focusing on the wet spots.

 

Understand, and I'm fine with that.  However, in an ideal world, these don't exist, and I can multitask and work on both at the same time.  I will keep trying different things and report back.  

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Are you making for yourself or to sell?

 

Once you get your label on, the eye will gravitate to the label and not the candle.

 

Trappeur

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Yeah, I'd like to sell eventually, but I'm 2 years into testing still, so mostly myself and family/friends.  Plus, I'm a engineer/science nerd, so I want to know WTF is going on with stuff like this :).  

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I'm also allergic to wet spots... If there is a lot of them I DO think the customers care as they buy with their eyes.

 

If there is one spot they are more likely to be okay with it.

 

Things to get around it, use a colored tumbler or use a wrap around sticker. 

 

I'm sure there is a way to minimize them with an additive... Palm wax doesn't have wet spots at all etc.. 

 

Have anyone tried Paraflint H-1 or Micro Wax? Crisco shortening should help a bit but can smoke. I need to do some serious testing!

 

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Since wet spots do not effect the throw of the candle, I am not willing to spend time or money to find a way to eliminate them. 

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4 hours ago, strugglebrother said:

I'm also allergic to wet spots... If there is a lot of them I DO think the customers care as they buy with their eyes.

I've honestly never had a single buyer mention them, not in 20 yrs of selling candles at wholesale.  I'm literally sitting in a showroom of candles made from:  paraffin/ soy/ soy blends/ apricot wax - any candle in a clear container has a visible wet spot..or many.

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On 9/19/2018 at 4:03 AM, Paintguru said:

 

 

Understand, and I'm fine with that.  However, in an ideal world, these don't exist, and I can multitask and work on both at the same time.  I will keep trying different things and report back.  

Yes they do exist.  You can do all the testing that you want but at some point, you will have wet spots appear here and there. Ya know, we do not live in an idea world..just pour your candles, test for the desired throw and go from there.  If you spend your time focusing on wet spots, you are missing the big picture..........the hot throw.....JMHO

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On 9/18/2018 at 6:10 AM, Paintguru said:

I know customers don't care about these, but after my transition to 4630, I'm having real issues with many, small wet spots on some 8 oz jars.  This last go around, I tried pouring hotter (170F or so), and covering the two test candles with a box to help insulate it.  Definitely fewer wet spots, but still enough to be noticeable.  Is this all about cooling rate?  I work in my basement (it is summer though), so should I run a portable heater down to my work room and heat the room up?  The other side is, should I pour a lot cooler to minimize the amount of cooling needed before solidification?  I'm surprised how many wet spots I have with this wax compared to the soy wax I used previously.  

have you tried wrapping something around your candles after you pour?  I made little felt wraps that I cocoon my candles with to slow the cooling--they work great.  I occasionally get a small wet spot now which I don't love but I feel like I did everything possible to prevent it.  

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4630 is one of the worst waxes as far as glass adhesion goes. Even if you warm jars and do everything under the sun to prevent them early on... they will show up soon anyways.

With 4630 you either have to just accept it and stop worrying about it or move on if it bothers you enough.

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Ok, I poured some 4630 container candles about a week ago,,,,,they did have some wet spots due to the local climate and cooling process...so I hit the jars with my heat gun and eliminated all of them.....set the jars aside and pulled them out of the closet today..........yeah, the wet spots are back due to the local temps.......like I really care about the wet spots...local temps and humidity will determine whether wet spots appear or not.

I'm moving on.....if I have a great HT from this particular candle then I am happy,,,,,,,,,,,wet spots be damned.

 

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9 hours ago, Pam W said:

Ok, I poured some 4630 container candles about a week ago,,,,,they did have some wet spots due to the local climate and cooling process...so I hit the jars with my heat gun and eliminated all of them.....set the jars aside and pulled them out of the closet today..........yeah, the wet spots are back due to the local temps.......like I really care about the wet spots...local temps and humidity will determine whether wet spots appear or not.

I'm moving on.....if I have a great HT from this particular candle then I am happy,,,,,,,,,,,wet spots be damned.

 

Agree with you. Yes, I prefer waxes with less wet spot issues, but not a deal breaker for me or anything. And yes, 4630 throws great. I will say I haven't had great wicking results with it. 

little too much soot for me even when wicked correctly.  But, I still use it some.. mostly to blend

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On 10/11/2018 at 8:33 AM, wthomas57 said:

Agree with you. Yes, I prefer waxes with less wet spot issues, but not a deal breaker for me or anything. And yes, 4630 throws great. I will say I haven't had great wicking results with it. 

little too much soot for me even when wicked correctly.  But, I still use it some.. mostly to blend

What type of wicks do you use?  I use Eco wicks and do get some sooting if I go too heavy on the FO....or do not trim as needed.

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On 10/13/2018 at 10:42 PM, Pam W said:

What type of wicks do you use?  I use Eco wicks and do get some sooting if I go too heavy on the FO....or do not trim as needed.

Yah, I'm not a fan of ECOs at all. They start off ok for a bit but end up with huge wild flames and lots of soot.  Next to impossible to size correctly. If I i use them, its only in soy or soy blends, never in parrafin. There are several options for 4630 that all work similarly. Id try LX, HTP, Zinc, Cotton, Paper, etc... all before I'd settled on ECO.

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