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Taking FO Flash Point into consideration


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Fragrance Oils have individual Flash Points.  CandleScience has them on the label.

I've been told the flash point should be considered when adding the FO to melted wax, and that this process (done successfully or not) will directly affect the candles cold and hot throw.  I've also been told pouring temperature is also a factor in the Flash Point.

Can anyone enlighten me?!

I'm using IGI 4630.

I've also been told that companies such as CandleScience prioritize fragrances that work better with vegetable waxes.  Since 4630 is all paraffin and I buy most of my FO from CS, I really need this information to choose FO more suitable for 4630 and also know exactly how I should treat them.

Chemistry 101 ;-)

Thanks in advance for the helpful information to come ;-)

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I'm sure others will chime in as well that have way more knowledge than me but my understanding is the flashpoint means nothing more than when the oil will combust when near a flame, and is listed mostly for shipping considerations.

I add my oils at 180, all of them and have no problems with throw, at least not related to that. That's a common piece of misinformation that gets spread around.

As far as CS oils I don't know that they make their oils geared towards soy but they have a leaf rating for those they have found to work well in Soy. I've used their oils in paraffins and blends just fine. 

Edited by KimmyPee
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Forget everything you've heard about flashpoints.  Flashpoint is only relevant for shipping purposes. 

I use a lot of 4630.  I heat to 185-190, add FO, stir 1-2 minutes and pour.  You will want to add your FO at around that temp for best results.  Lower and it may not mix well.  FP has nothing to do with it.
I don't know that CS prioritizes FO's for soy.  They do have a soy rating system so buyers will know what to expect when using an FO in soy.  In my experience, the majority of the oils sold by CS work well in 4630 regardless of the soy rating.  Some oils are naturally lighter than others, and testing is the only fool proof way to determine if it's is going to perform well in your application.  

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4 hours ago, KimmyPee said:

I'm sure others will chime in as well that have way more knowledge than me but my understanding is the flashpoint means nothing more than when the oil will combust when near a flame, and is listed mostly for shipping considerations.

I add my oils at 180, all of them and have no problems with throw, at least not related to that. That's a common piece of misinformation that gets spread around.

As far as CS oils I don't know that they make their oils geared towards soy but they have a leaf rating for those they have found to work well in Soy. I've used their oils in paraffins and blends just fine. 

Thank you!!

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4 hours ago, bfroberts said:

Forget everything you've heard about flashpoints.  Flashpoint is only relevant for shipping purposes. 

I use a lot of 4630.  I heat to 185-190, add FO, stir 1-2 minutes and pour.  You will want to add your FO at around that temp for best results.  Lower and it may not mix well.  FP has nothing to do with it.
I don't know that CS prioritizes FO's for soy.  They do have a soy rating system so buyers will know what to expect when using an FO in soy.  In my experience, the majority of the oils sold by CS work well in 4630 regardless of the soy rating.  Some oils are naturally lighter than others, and testing is the only fool proof way to determine if it's is going to perform well in your application.  

Thank you!!!

 

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TallTayl beat me too it. Very good thread she referenced, and as others have said, flash point is the temperature at which something will combust or ignite if introduced to a spark or flame. That's it. Simple as that and no need to worry about flashpoint when adding FO when making candles, unless you are making candles around an open flame. (Which you should not be doing anyway!) 

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