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Water in Soy


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Just finished my candle jars for my November 18 sale. I noticed white wax in my Presto as my wax melted in the wax pot. Thought I was just being sloppy. Today, the wax seemed cloudy all the way up to 185. I was going to contact Nature's Garden to see if they had an answer. Then I noticed a tiny hole in my wax pot. So I guess I have water in half of the candles I plan on selling in two weeks. Yeah, ready to cry.

Is there any way these will still be okay to sell? The tops are nice and smooth, but who knows "what lies beneath." How does the water affect the soy if it is in my pint jars?

GoldieMN :(

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Guest OldGlory

Goldie, I am not following the events that led up to thinking you have water in the candles. Can you explain it again? And if someone else does understand and gives you a good answer, then forget my request for another explanation. I don't understand how the water could have gotten into the wax.

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Hi Goldie,

 

Now if that was my situation "especially" being that you would be reselling the tarts I wouldn't take a chance what so ever.  But that is just me.  It just wouldn't be worth it if one of the tarts that was melting started to spitter spatter and get in someones face or bounce onto a kid with the hot wax.  I can understand that you are trying to salvage these things....but just not worth having the possibility of a casualty.  Now i would keep them for myself and burn.....I would do that......

 

Trappeur

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I'd call it a sunk cost, pitch them and move on. It's a business expense. Out of curiosity I would cut them all open to see the extent of the problem, but sell them, not a chance.

 

Trying to salvage them will cost more time and money, and could still end up not being the premium product your customers expect. Chalk it up to experience.

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That's fine. I just thought since there is no flame with the tarts it would be safe. Safety is my priority as well.

I certainly will try to cut into the solid wax to see if I get any liquid just to see; still won't use any of them to sell.

I mark every jar with tape indicating date, %, wick as they cool. Had I not just took all the tape off and put the new (bad jars) in with the previous jars that don't have water in them, I wouldn't have to repour all my candles. Oh well, it could have been worse in a number of ways.

So appreciate all of your help. :)

GoldieMN

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Are you using the pour pot in a double boiler?  Melting in the Presto and then pouring into the pour pot and keeping it at the temp you want in a pot of water? If so, buy a single or double electric eye unit at wally world (the eyes are covered) and keep a thermometer in the pot. I use a tempered glass coffee pots and they hold up fine.  HTH

 

Steve

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Yes. I have a Presto pot with water in the bottom 4 inches. Then I use a tall, handled metal pot that holds the soy flakes with a thermometer clipped on the inside. When soy gets to 185-190, I pour into a large glass Pyrex measuring "cup" (holds 60 ounces or so). I read where I could put a metal cookie cutter under the metal pot so the pot isn't in contact with the Presto. Thinking that might prevent future problems?

Now, I'm interested in what you are describing. Do you simply use glass coffeepots on one of the burners? If so, no worries about glass cracking if that burner gets to a certain temperature? I wonder if I couldn't even use a glass coffeepot with an open handle in the Presto. Hook the handle on the top of the Presto... Just thinking "outloud" here. Good or bad, would like to hear your thoughts.

GoldieMN

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The Presto will melt your wax without burning it. it never comes in contact with the heat source and will be fine up to whatever temp you heat. You can put a spout on your pot or use a ladle to fill your coffee pot or pour pot. I used to mix everything in the Presto and then pour into my jars through my pour spout that I installed myself. I never thought of using it as a double boiler. I use a turkey fryer to heat about 25 pounds of wax at 200 degrees and have never had the wax burst into flames or burn. You put the coffee pot on a scale and ladle your wax in it and then add fo and color. Keep the pour pots on your double burner and keep a thermometer in your pots. I use an oven thermometer with a long silver cord and a probe on the end and can look at the read out for temp.  HTH

 

Steve

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Things are really flying today! The wax is melting and getting to 185 MUCH faster putting it directly in the Presto. Does it make any difference if it gets to the 185 quickly? Or should I have it melt slowly by setting the dial to 200.GoldieMN

Quickly is a problem if you don't stop the heat soon enough. On the way up there is still a climb after you pull the plug. I set mine to the 200 range and watch to turn it off when about 2/3 melted. There's plenty of latent heat to melt it the rest of the way. I stir a bit as it melts to distribute the hot spots.

Eta, i would not set the thing to much higher only because the bottom wax could easily begin to overheat before the cold wax above melts.

Edited by TallTayl
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You have to really keep your eye on the temp because the Presto is more of a general guideline and not that accurate. We all like to see our wax melt fast so we can get to business and not wait around. I get everything ready while the wax is melting and then give the wax a good stir with my faithful wooden spoon. Its really nice if you're going to pour a case or two of a certain fragrance and color. You measure it all out and then you can pour candles like crazy. You'll get the hang of it in no time. HTH  Did you ever decide if any of your candles had water in them?

 

Steve

Edited by chuck_35550
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I poked holes to the bottom of a number of jars and turned them over to see if liquid would come out. Didn't see anything. I didn't do it to all of the jars, though. I did start to burn one candle jar even if it was only a couple days since pouring it. I did notice some crackling. Not sure but thought that might be water?

It wasn't all a loss as I've learned so much from the misfortune. AND now I am cutting my time in at least half by heating the wax directly in the Presto. Got 43 candles poured today so 2/3's done. I can also see how useful a double burner will be as things move pretty quickly. :)

You are all soooooo great!

GoldieMN

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Quickly is a problem if you don't stop the heat soon enough. On the way up there is still a climb after you pull the plug. I set mine to the 200 range and watch to turn it off when about 2/3 melted. There's plenty of latent heat to melt it the rest of the way. I stir a bit as it melts to distribute the hot spots.

Eta, i would not set the thing to much higher only because the bottom wax could easily begin to overheat before the cold wax above melts.

If the temperature of the wax gets too high, like over 200, does it affect the candle?

GoldieMN

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If the temperature of the wax gets too high, like over 200, does it affect the candle?

GoldieMN

it can definitely change how the wax performs, the color and add a wretched stink to it. Happened in one of my water jacket melters last year. The wax only got to maybe 190-200, yet the overheated wax had a soy cooking oil stink that was not overcome by the fragrance added to the candle. Was worse when lit.

 

As far as the crackling sound, yep sounds like the encapsulated water in the wax. Imagine if a customer heard that - eek!

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it can definitely change how the wax performs, the color and add a wretched stink to it. Happened in one of my water jacket melters last year. The wax only got to maybe 190-200, yet the overheated wax had a soy cooking oil stink that was not overcome by the fragrance added to the candle. Was worse when lit.

 

As far as the crackling sound, yep sounds like the encapsulated water in the wax. Imagine if a customer heard that - eek!

So glad you shared this and will slow down a bit to keep an eye on the temperature of the wax. There was one batch that I couldn't smell at all. Started thinking I had a senior moment and didn't add the fragrance! Maybe it was a batch that got too hot. I did not smell anything like soy cooking oil at all.
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I wouldn't worry about it, my turkey fryer is 200 degrees and its never presented a problem. I keep an eye on my pour pot temp and if it climbs past 190 degrees, it comes off the eye. Pour temp for my parasoy is best at 185 to 190 degrees. My wax is 75% soy and 25% paraffin. HTH

Steve

Thanks, Steve. Hopefully, I dodged a bullet this time.

Goldie

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