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how much wax do you pour in a day?

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The most I ever poured in a day single handed was around 600 but that was just pouring not labeling or clean up of the jars.

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The most I ever poured in a day single handed was around 600 but that was just pouring not labeling or clean up of the jars.

Oh my gosh, you poured 600 jars in one day?

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Yep but you have to have the room and the melters to pull that off you are never going to do that in a presto pot. They actually took 3 days First day prep. Load melters, clean and wick jars, second day pour, third day clean up and label. If I had help I can do it all in one day every day. Someone to clean and wick someone to pour and someone for cleaning and labeling. The most I ever did just using a presto pot was about 50 or so.

I did have some good sized melters a 200lb one and 2 160 lb ones.

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Wow Vicky that is crazy....did you just have unscented or were they scented too? do you normally pour 100 or more everyday? I heard the vats use a ton of electricity.

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Honestly physically pouring like that takes a toll on you. I could not keep helpers so I scaled back. When I was doing that was when the economy was really strong. So finding help was hard and keeping them was harder. So I scaled back thank goodness so when the economy went down hill I was just back to doing craft shows and festivals. A year ago I went back to hobby level because physically I was struggling to keep doing shows.

It depends on the melter how much electricity they use, my direct heat ones used less that the water jacket melters. It takes for ever to heat that much water plus wax.

Pouring a 100 candles a day is not an unreasonable expectation. It is all space, equipment and time management.

Little advice do not try to pour 100 in a 100 different scent and di it in one day. Plan it to where you are only pouring 1 or 2 FO a day. The more you have to change for the FO the slower you go.

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When I was pouring large amounts I used a blend of my own it was a mix of paraffin and soy. I could pour a lot hotter than straight soy.

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Guest OldGlory

I sell wholesale on a small scale. For years I worked full time (36-40 hours a week) and manufactured and sold an average of $10,000 in candles a year to my largest wholesale customer.

I have 2 presto pots and 3 aluminum pouring pots. The average size candle that I pour is for 8 oz jars and tins, and I use both 464 and 6006. I'm very picky about my soy candles and temper the wax (let it cool to a slushy stage and then heat it again for a bit) to get the results I want, so my soy candles take a LONG time. 6006 is super quick. It balances out.

While I am melting the wax I wick and tray a bunch of containers. I weigh out the melted wax, weigh in the FO, add color, and the soy sits for a while the 6006 gets poured right away. Back to wicking and traying more containers. I also put the caution label on the bottom before pouring. My hands are busy and I am moving the whole day.

I never prepare/pour less than 35 oz at a time, and every batch is either 35 oz or 70 oz. I may have a few extra candles for the next order made up in advance which will come in 4 weeks and that's fine. I have found that if I stick to 2 size batches the colors are consistent. It's also easier to keep up with 2 sets of numbers/measurements rather than an always moving number.

I can pour up to 200 candles in a day if I have to, and then they have to sit and cool overnight. Label the next day and pack while getting the next batch melted and poured. Effective time management is very important. If I'm not busy with some task the entire day, I'm doing something wrong. I don't answer my phone except on my meal break. No interruptions at all except to let the dog out.

My average pour for a day is 100-150 candles.

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I can pour 200 8oz jars in one day with 1 presto pot. My biggest issue is getting my husband to bring me a sandwich without having to stop and ask him for it.

  • Haha 1

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I was wondering because I had another vendor tell me she does 80 lbs or different scented wax melts every single day...thats she does chunk mixes so each lbs is a different scent and color....I was trying to figure out how she does it...every single day for months? is it even humanly possible to do that with out scorching the wax the time it takes to mix the first few batches and pour the rest would get scorched...or am I just slow lol. I would hurt so bad to be standing all day everyday...

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If she is pouring that much-and she could be-she is using big melters where temps are regulated. Even in my Prestos I can control temp so it will not overheat.

Even turkey fryers I have been researching can hold several gallons of wax.

If you will aim for this to pay as a full time job/business, it will require full time hours. A mix of pouring, ordering supplies, packing orders, customer service, maintaining social media sites and keeping website current.

All that, of course, comes as and after a nice customer base is established. That takes time and of course, money.

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I put in about 13 hours a day at it right now. but I do not have a big pot so I have to just do a few lbs at a time....I think that is my biggest issue not having the best equipment. to get more done.....next question...if someone(me someday hopefully) were to pour say 100lbs a day everyday would that not bring in 10 of thousands of dollars a month....before all the bills and reordering and shipping costs and lable and all that stuff. I do not know how candles work wit price but with melts it is normally $1 per oz.....100lbs a day is a lot of oz....lol I am trying to get a realistic idea and goals sert up...You all have put in so much work and you know better then I what is and is not possible. I do not want to be one of those people with crazy notions who fail because they did not grasp what they were doing. I want to make a solid plan based on reality.

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I put in about 13 hours a day at it right now. but I do not have a big pot so I have to just do a few lbs at a time....I think that is my biggest issue not having the best equipment. to get more done.....next question...if someone(me someday hopefully) were to pour say 100lbs a day everyday would that not bring in 10 of thousands of dollars a month....before all the bills and reordering and shipping costs and lable and all that stuff. I do not know how candles work wit price but with melts it is normally $1 per oz.....100lbs a day is a lot of oz....lol I am trying to get a realistic idea and goals sert up...You all have put in so much work and you know better then I what is and is not possible. I do not want to be one of those people with crazy notions who fail because they did not grasp what they were doing. I want to make a solid plan based on reality.

Assuming you SELL that much and not just pour that much, then yes, but in reality, selling is way harder than making. As justajesuschick said, establishing a customer base takes time and effort, and a LOT of both. Once it's established then you have to worry about keeping your product fresh and new and exciting to keep/maintain said customer base, as well as trying to entice new customers in. With as many options as people have, it's a difficult thing to do.

Good luck!

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How much we pour and what we pour depends. During the fall we average around 100 pounds/day with max of 300 lbs/day (just candles). But we also have to pour votives, pillars and melts. So, some days we don't pour but 30 or so pounds of candles but pour a 100 or so votives and a couple hundred melts in clamshells. It just depends on what wholesale/mailorders we get, what our inventory stock looks like and what we need for our store. There are five us who pour/create, and our warehouse is fairly large, so we can kick out a lot when needed. HTH

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wow. So do is it possible to sell large amounts like this a day? after you have been at it for sometime? I want to someday expand and hopefully have to hire people lol I do body care too. have for some time now. but nothing this big. I would love to be able to make this my full time business.

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wow. So do is it possible to sell large amounts like this a day? after you have been at it for sometime? I want to someday expand and hopefully have to hire people lol I do body care too. have for some time now. but nothing this big. I would love to be able to make this my full time business.

Of course it's possible! :) With a lot of hard work, discipline, etc, etc., and add a dash of luck in there too.

Anything is possible if you work hard enough at it.

IMO in this business there is no such thing as an overnight success.

Keep at it. If it's truly your dream and passion, and you do things right, it will come. It may just take some time. :)

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I just assumed that kind of sells were for the very...very few...like Yankee or the other big brands sold in big stores(but I assumed they make more then 100 lbs a day lol) I never thought any of the smaller vendors could ever get that big....I would love to. I love hard work(I am crazy I think). I always assumed selling $5000 dollars worth a month was making it big lol.

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I just assumed that kind of sells were for the very...very few...like Yankee or the other big brands sold in big stores(but I assumed they make more then 100 lbs a day lol) I never thought any of the smaller vendors could ever get that big....I would love to. I love hard work(I am crazy I think). I always assumed selling $5000 dollars worth a month was making it big lol.

I think the big boys like Yankee, et al, probably pour more like thousands upon thousands of pounds a day and have a production line, several factories and machines, etc., to do it all.

$5k a month would be great, and as good as most average "regular" jobs/careers, and is perfectly possible.

What is it that Disney said - if you can dream it, you can do it! Just remember that, and keep plugging away!! :)

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