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How long are unburned candles good for


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I have heard of people storing them indoors (out of sunlight/severe temp. changes) for over six months without any bad effects. I also think I read a link here where someone left candles in a "shed" through the winter and such and to their surprise the candles ended up smelling great. I'm sure some more experienced chandlers will chime in here.:wink2:

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My soy definitely gets better with age. I made a vanilla one last Jan and it did not seem too strong even at 9%. I got disgusted shoved in my candle closet and forgot about it until this past December. I open the jar and lit it and the throw just about blew my socks off! Than one 8oz JJ scented my whole house.

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I made a candle when I first started that was wicked wrong. I too put it in the cupboard and forgot about it. I burned it over a year later and even though it was wicked wrong in the first place as soon as it started getting a melt pool (not a large or full melt pool it had just started melting wax) it scented my whole basement and then the scent filled my whole house. If I could cure every candle I made for at least a year I would. Talk about running you out of the house scent. It was the best candle I ever burned.

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Yep, just like fine wine.:wink2: I found some that I'd made a couple years ago when I first started making candles and had stuck away in a box. Burned them just for the heck of it and man were they strong! No funky or off smell at all. If they're in a dark place so they don't fade and in a controlled temp. I think they only get better.

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Wow, I had no idea! I'm still wet behind the ears about a lot of things to do with candle-making, but I'm trying to learn as fast as I can. I've got a craft booth reserved for a 3-day county festival this coming august, and I was planning on waiting until June to start making up the candles for it (cuz I thought they'd be poor quality if they weren't "fresh"). So this info is GREAT to hear! I can go ahead & get started on it anytime now & not have to worry about working long days/nights all summer in the kitchen. Yay! :grin2:

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Same here.I have been burning some from last year and they smell great.Also I sold some candles cheaper this year that I had from last.I had people look and say"What is wrong with them"I said nothing just some from last year and the answer I got back was"I don't see why that would matter".Should have sold them the same as the other. It's just NOT ME though.

LynnS

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I've had a variety of new candles in tins stored in a box in a hallway for 1.5 yrs. and when I checked them this Fall only the Pumpkin Spice smelled old; the Christmas Tree and Cranberry were fine. Actually the smell was kind of like a solvent smell. They were made by a company that produces pure Soy candles but I'm wondering if the orange dye and the tin have reacted to cause the smell. Suppose I'll never know but wish I had one in a glass to compare to. I haven't burned any to check the fragrance.

Linda

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It was the same for me with Cake Bake.I decided it just did not have much scent.So I kept it myself and burned it.WOW it was awesome.Very strong.So here was one with no cold throw but great with a hot throw.It was one of the older candles too. I would check that candle you have in a tin(if you still have it) It may be great.Trouble is you may not be able to convince someone else.

LynnS

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Thanks for all the replies, I am thinking I will put a few up for a year and see what happens. I do notice that if I burn them soon after pouring them that I can not smell them. I lit one today that I made 3 weeks ago and I can smell it all through my house, can't wait to see results after being stored for a while. :cool2:

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I have heard of people storing them indoors (out of sunlight/severe temp. changes) for over six months without any bad effects. I also think I read a link here where someone left candles in a "shed" through the winter and such and to their surprise the candles ended up smelling great. I'm sure some more experienced chandlers will chime in here.:wink2:

That would be me. I have my candles stored in an un-heated shed. They smell better than ever! They have been out there for more than a year and just keep getting better and better:yay:

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