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Found 26 results

  1. These are today’s trials in wax! The original test was to try a two-toned pillar, but I got impatient so I tried for an intentional bleed. So the test kind of worked on that one. I’m going to spend a little time next week just focusing on one mold a day for testing; using the different sized molds just makes it too confusing!
  2. Hi everyone, new candle maker here! I would love to get your opinions on wax's and wick's. I've read through a lot of the forums already and can't seem to find the answers I'm looking for. Basically I'd love to stay away from Paraffin if possible but soy is not giving me the hot throw I'd like. With my brand I do want to strive for a very good hot throw. Can you please let me know what wax and wick combo you've found best for a mostly natural, great hot throw candle? I'm using 8oz, straight sided, glass jars with my candles. Thank you!
  3. Is there a general rule as to what the interior temperature of a paraffin candle should be when you do your second pour? I use a slender meat thermometer when I start to make my first probe.
  4. How do y'all decide how much extra paraffin to melt to account for the second pour? I'm ending up with too much leftover wax. Is there some sort of percentage of the weight of the candle or some general guideline for overage? Or is there none? Use this example: Let's say you want to test a new formula or wax and wick combo and you only want to pour one candle. Just one! You are using a mold that holds 10 ounces and you don't want much leftover wax. How would you determine how much wax to melt for that one task? Q
  5. Maybe I'm splitting hairs, but I was thinking about what difference does the melting point matter? None of my paraffin is ever melted at that point. It's never completely melted until the temperature is way up there, so why not wait until the wax is completely melted before adding the solid dye, in my case. My question is: Should I add the solid dye when my thermometer shows the "melting point" or should I wait until the paraffin is completely melted no matter how high the actual temp may be? I've been working with IGI 4625, which only shows a Working/Pouring range of 175-185 F. I'm pouring at 177 degrees F. 7% Stearic and 1% Vybar. 6% fragrance load.
  6. Take a look at this picture(s) and notice the BULDGE at the top. It started from the first burn and is continuing now at day five. I've at least progressed to the point where I'm not getting blowouts. As you can see it's also burning evenly. I don't ever recall seeing a commercially made candle do this. Is this common to homemade candles? In general, what are the possible reasons that could cause this? Here is some data: 1. Country Lane General Purpose Wax, 12ozs 2. EricX #24 FT Light wick. I pre-wax them myself. 3. Poured at 175F which falls within the manufacturer's specs. 4. Fragrance load of 4% or .48 ozs for 12 ozs of wax. 5. .40 ozs stearic acid. The mold is 3" in diameter & 31/2 high.
  7. In all the stuff I've been reading and hearing from people about stearic, I've somehow missed the part about When to add it to the process. Is it at the start with the unmelted paraffin for pillars? Is it after the melt? At the end? At a certain temperature? Thanks everyone, Q
  8. At what point in your pillar making journey with paraffin, do you know it's time to consider some sort of additives are needed? Stearic acid perhaps? I've tried to do everything in a step-by-step, scientific method type of way. I'm taking notes, etc. I can't seem to get any sort of consistent results. Really puzzled as to what should be done next. Q
  9. What did I do wrong here? I punched two holes on each side of the wick like your supposed to. Then I refilled the cavity with the same wax. I poured into one hole and the wax came out the other, so I assumed it was filled. I removed the centering tool so you could see. What do I do next? Can it be salvaged. I followed the paraffin maker's heating temps, went to bed, and this it what I found this morning.
  10. Lambosi

    What Hot Throw? try Again

    So, I started making wax. Not candles, tarts. Here's how I started. First experiment was 464 soy from NG with additive. All fragrance oils I've used so far for EVERYTHING Ive made is Natures Garden or Just Scent. Heated up the soy 464 to 185. added the FO ad 180 or 175 for most, or lower if the flashpoint was lower. 12% to everything since over read you want to add about 1.5 to 2 ounces per pound, which ends up being about 12 percent. I try melting it a week later after it cures. It takes about 8 ounces of it, placed in the 5 burners I have to even FAINTLY smell it. You have to stand directly over the warmers to smell it. So like everyone else, I researched. Then I found NG pillar of bliss. that like you all know has paraffin and the soy mixed. Heated the paraffin up to 185, and then also added the FO at 185. Heated up the paraffin to 185, and then let the temp drop to 175, before adding FO. I made a batch with 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12% FO. all heating up to 185 and adding FO at 175. THEN I made a batch with 50% of the 464 NG Soy with 50% of the NG Pillar of bliss. Once again, made 5 batches with 8,9,10,11, and 12 percent, heating to 185, and adding FO at 170. no good no good no good NO GOOD. Next wax, Just Scent Pillar of votive. Heated to 185 and added oils at 175. just made a 8% 10% and 12% currently curing, but I've been smelling the 3 and not having a good feeling. Final test. Back to the NG Pillar of Bliss by itself, but heating up to 195, and now adding the FO at 185 (like it says) I did the 6.25% (which is basically the 1 ounce to 1 pound ratio on a much smaller scale) and then 8% 10% and 12% currently curing, but not having the best feeling. heres been my melting process, that IDK is approved by the wax forum lords of this world, and may be my problem. If Ive been making a larger scale wax, I use a pouring pot, and let it sit in a pot of water on medium heat on the stove until it reaches temp. once it does I take it off the heat, and start letting it cool and add my FO once it reaches certain flash points, and pour after stirring for 2 minutes of adding the oil. no matter the temp. If its a smaller scale of wax (which it usually is) I put the wax in a glass measuring cup, and put it into the pot of hot water and baby sit it till it reaches temp, It usually climbs to 185 fairly quick ( about 5 min or less) but if I'm heating it up to 195 it usually takes over 10 minutes and sits around 190-193 forever before reaching 195, and i think that could be the downfalls of the paraffin experiment. If Im making the small quantities in the pouring pot, it reaches 195 real quick, but then as soon as i take it off the heat, the temp rapidly starts dropping, and by the time it starts reaching 185 i literally have a 2 second window to put in my fragrance, if i leave it off the heat the wax will literally drop from 195 to 150 in the matter of 45 seconds; its insane. I can't even stir it for my 2 to 3 minutes. I try to stir it with the pot halfway in the water for a couple minutes, and then turn around and pour it. even from the 5 second of removing from heat to pouring in molds, it already starts to harden around the top of the pouring pot, and I think that maybe that whole process is hopeless. Masters, veterans. Women. My female Lords of this. I am a 25 year old dude that wants to impress the lady, and potentially others with this simple, yet amazing creation that one calls wax tarts. Please, If you have read this much, I thank you. I virtually kiss your eye balls for reading my pain. But someone please end this pain. Please end my long internet forum readings. My crazy ass formulas and methods. My typical 25 year old male mind of overthinking something so simple. Give me the answer. give me the gold. give me your SECRET. If you dont want to post your secret formula on a website, thats cool. Could ya message it to me? could you give me something else to try that could give me some hope? some shining light at the end of the infinite dark tunnel? I Love you all.
  11. I've been making candles now for about 6 months. I've seen so many different ideas on which wax to use in pillars, in particular paraffin. Is it absolutely necessary to make probe holes everytime to fill the shrinkage area inside? Should I only do that if I see evidence such as a visible hole after the candle has cooled? I've got plenty of questions, but this will do for now
  12. Just wondering which throws a better scent? parasoy, soy, or paraffin. (In your experience.) I've heard paraffin throws best but I'm not sure if they mean with vybar or without. Thanks!
  13. I'm using IGI 6006 and have tried multiple wicks with no success yet. Im wondering if I'd have an easier time if I add another brand of soy like 464 or what. I love the blends. Any other suggestions for a blend wax? thanks in advance!
  14. I was doing a search about wax stuff & this nonsense came up. I don't like fear mongering. I don't like it one bit. https://wellnessmama.com/22656/dont-use-scented-candles/
  15. I am getting ready to use a Paraffin wax. I want to make pillar candles and Cut and curl candles. Which is best type to use? I have purchased all my molds. However I have only made soy wax candles. I currently use Candle Science but there shipping rates are RIDICULOUS!!!! I am looking for a new Supplier Can you recommend a good one? I live in southern Illinois. I have no problem buying from several suppliers but knowing who they are is not easy. I spend hours online looking. I was wondering which supplier has the strongest fragrance oil? I am new to this and have limited funds. So I really need some seasoned help. Thank you so much for your assistance.
  16. Hi everyone! I am wondering what everyone's favorite, preferably one pour, paraffin wax/paraffin blend is for excellent hot and cold throws? I've been experimenting with 4627 and it's been so difficult to wick! Thanks so much!
  17. Hi I'm new here and I have a million questions but I will start with one lol ~ my question is if I'm blending 2 waxes with 2 different pour temps what temp should I choose to pour at? Any advise will be truly appreciated ~ Thanks
  18. Just wondering if anyone has blended paraffin and palm before, to make a container blend. And if so are there any gotchas I should know about before I travel down that road 8-)
  19. Skill level - Beginner to intermediate due to the layering aspect and being familiar with pouring pillars Pillar wax – this can be any type of pillar wax – either a blend, or straight paraffin. *NOTE- I have used IGI4625 and MP140 Pre-production blend wax – both with very similar results. With a straight paraffin you might want to add some sort of additives to keep it from mottling or being too rustic looking. You want them to be smooth and creamy looking. – I have never made these using a soy blend or straight soy so I cannot speak to the outcome, but I see no reason why it wouldn’t work with soy. As long as it’s a pillar wax – and can be molded.Mold – any metal pillar mold will work – I do not recommend plastic or polycarbonate molds as the scent tends to pit the plastic - I am using a conical metal mold for this due to the shape, it better represents a candy corn I believe. Wick - however you would normally wick the mold you are using, and whatever wick size works for the size candle you are making with the type of wax you are using is the wick you want to use. (to wick my molds, I use flat braided wicks and a homemade “jiffy wicker” system - explained within this tutorial) Scent - optional - I like my candy corns to smell like a candy corn so I will be using a Honey Vanilla/Candy Corn scent I get from Candles and SuppliesCandle Dye - I find that liquid candle dyes work much better due to the fluid nature of the liquids vs. blocks that you have to melt. The blocks don’t disperse nearly as easily.Melt pot - this can be a double boiler or a presto pot. Whatever you are familiar with using to melt your wax.Pour pot - this is whatever you normally use to pour your wax into your mold with. If you use your presto pot for this, it might be easier to get/make and use a separate pour pot.Scale - to weigh out the wax you need and also scent if you use it.Additives - this is optional - only use additives if you normally use additives for your particular pillar wax you have chosen to use.*NOTE - I will be using the MP140 Pre-production wax for this tutorial which is a paraffin blend that requires no additives, so I will skip this part. If you are using additives, add them whenever you normally would for your pillars.Stir stick - To stir wax, scent and color. I use the handle of a wooden spoon. I’ve been using it for 14 years, and it hasn’t failed me yet. Skewer - To poke relief holes Heat Gun - Optional - it’s handy for cleanupGriddle or leveler - to level candle while still in moldPaper towels - optional but very helpful for clean-upEmbed or tart mold(s) - optional but can be helpfulPliers - optional - I need them to undo the wick from the mold once the candle is ready to be unmolded Step 1: Weigh out your wax. Weigh out enough to fill your mold ⅓ of the way. I am going to be making 3 pillars at a time. For measuring purposes and ease of scenting each layer, I will use 8 oz of wax. Because each layer is a different color, I will be weighing out, melting and pouring 8oz of wax 3 times. Add wax to your melt pot and melt wax Step 2: As your wax is melting, weigh out your scent and set aside. Also prep your mold with wick. Since this is 8oz wax, I will be using .5 oz scent. Here is the homemade jiffy wicker system I use for wicking my pillars. It’s easy to make, just create a slip knot at one end of the wicking, so when pulling the long end it does not come undone, use a piece of craft foam cut into a square, and a wick tab.Then thread them all together. It will end up at the bottom of the mold and I put a wick bar across the top of the mold to secure the wick. Step 3: Determine your colors and get them ready. I use Peaks liquid candle dyes. For this particular candle I am using the following colors - Orange and Yellow. For the white, I am not using any color for the wax. Beware - this is a vanilla scent and can discolor your wax. Over the years, I have had them go to a darker off-white color but never anything darker than that. I don’t bother with a stabilizer, but if you want yours to stay pristine white, you might want to invest in one. Step 4: Once your wax is melted pour out of melt pot into the pour pot. Add scent as you normally would, but do not color. The first layer will be the top of your candle so you want to leave it white. Pour to the ⅓ mark of your mold. (I have my molds marked to where they should be poured too with a magic marker on the outside of the mold as you can see in the previous picture of my molds) Step 5: You will most likely have some wax left over from this first pour. This wax will be used again in the 3rd layer, so you can either set aside in your pour pot to melt later, or pour into embed molds. I like to pour mine into embed molds. Clean out your pour pot with paper towels to prepare for the second layer Step 6: While you first layer is setting up to be firm enough to hold the 2nd layer, now I weigh out my second layer wax and scent. Also prepare to color this layer orange. Once the first layer is ready to hold the second layer and your wax is melted, pour into your pour pot, scent and color. I use 1-2 drops (2 drops MAX) for this. The wax I use takes color very well, and if I use more than the 2 drops the middle orange layer gets way too dark. For these candles, I used 1 drop. This second layer (using the molds I use) will use all of this 8oz of wax, so no need to pour any extra into an embed mold. (See Step 10 if you have leftover wax) Step 7: Get ready for your 3rd layer. Your layers should look like this before pouring the next layer - For your third layer, repeat Step 6, but add the leftover wax from your first pour as well. Color with yellow and pour (I use 2 drops since yellow is a lighter color) Step 8: When your 3rd layer is set enough, poke relief holes Step 9: Once the candle is solid enough - finish off your candle with a repour. I take my wick bars off to do my repour, it makes it much easier and smoother so not as much leveling needs to be done at the end. Step 10: Set aside and let cool. You can either let them cool naturally, or after they are solid but still warm, you can place them in the refrigerator for a few minutes. If I am making a lot and on a deadline, I will place them in the refrigerator, if not, I let them cool naturally. Just do not freeze them. They could crack and split at the layers. Once the re-pour is done, if you still have wax left over (I never do at this point) you can pour it into an embed mold or tart molds to make wax melts. Step 12: Once cool, trim excess wick from taking the wick bar off, but don’t un-mold yet. - This part of the candle will most likely be bumpy and/or uneven. Warm a griddle (or whatever you normally use to level your candles) and level the candle. Clean griddle with a paper towel. Once that is done, undo wick and un-mold candle. For mine, it is sometimes difficult to get the slip knot untied, due to leaking wax or being too tightly tied, so I use a pair of pliers to untie the slip knot in the wick. Step 13: CONGRATULATIONS - At this point you should have beautiful Candy Corn scented pillar candles. The only step left now is to trim wicks, take a pic, post it, and enjoy the accolades of your beautiful creation! Click here to view the article
  20. Jcandleattic

    Candy Corn Pillar Tutorial

    Skill level - Beginner to intermediate due to the layering aspect and being familiar with pouring pillars Pillar wax – this can be any type of pillar wax – either a blend, or straight paraffin. *NOTE- I have used IGI4625 and MP140 Pre-production blend wax – both with very similar results. With a straight paraffin you might want to add some sort of additives to keep it from mottling or being too rustic looking. You want them to be smooth and creamy looking. – I have never made these using a soy blend or straight soy so I cannot speak to the outcome, but I see no reason why it wouldn’t work with soy. As long as it’s a pillar wax – and can be molded. Mold – any metal pillar mold will work – I do not recommend plastic or polycarbonate molds as the scent tends to pit the plastic - I am using a conical metal mold for this due to the shape, it better represents a candy corn I believe. Wick - however you would normally wick the mold you are using, and whatever wick size works for the size candle you are making with the type of wax you are using is the wick you want to use. (to wick my molds, I use flat braided wicks and a homemade “jiffy wicker” system - explained within this tutorial) Scent - optional - I like my candy corns to smell like a candy corn so I will be using a Honey Vanilla/Candy Corn scent I get from Candles and Supplies Candle Dye - I find that liquid candle dyes work much better due to the fluid nature of the liquids vs. blocks that you have to melt. The blocks don’t disperse nearly as easily. Melt pot - this can be a double boiler or a presto pot. Whatever you are familiar with using to melt your wax. Pour pot - this is whatever you normally use to pour your wax into your mold with. If you use your presto pot for this, it might be easier to get/make and use a separate pour pot. Scale - to weigh out the wax you need and also scent if you use it. Additives - this is optional - only use additives if you normally use additives for your particular pillar wax you have chosen to use.*NOTE - I will be using the MP140 Pre-production wax for this tutorial which is a paraffin blend that requires no additives, so I will skip this part. If you are using additives, add them whenever you normally would for your pillars. Stir stick - To stir wax, scent and color. I use the handle of a wooden spoon. I’ve been using it for 14 years, and it hasn’t failed me yet. Skewer - To poke relief holes Heat Gun - Optional - it’s handy for cleanup Griddle or leveler - to level candle while still in mold Paper towels - optional but very helpful for clean-up Embed or tart mold(s) - optional but can be helpful Pliers - optional - I need them to undo the wick from the mold once the candle is ready to be unmolded Step 1: Weigh out your wax. Weigh out enough to fill your mold ⅓ of the way. I am going to be making 3 pillars at a time. For measuring purposes and ease of scenting each layer, I will use 8 oz of wax. Because each layer is a different color, I will be weighing out, melting and pouring 8oz of wax 3 times. Add wax to your melt pot and melt wax Step 2: As your wax is melting, weigh out your scent and set aside. Also prep your mold with wick. Since this is 8oz wax, I will be using .5 oz scent. Here is the homemade jiffy wicker system I use for wicking my pillars. It’s easy to make, just create a slip knot at one end of the wicking, so when pulling the long end it does not come undone, use a piece of craft foam cut into a square, and a wick tab.Then thread them all together. It will end up at the bottom of the mold and I put a wick bar across the top of the mold to secure the wick. Step 3: Determine your colors and get them ready. I use Peaks liquid candle dyes. For this particular candle I am using the following colors - Orange and Yellow. For the white, I am not using any color for the wax. Beware - this is a vanilla scent and can discolor your wax. Over the years, I have had them go to a darker off-white color but never anything darker than that. I don’t bother with a stabilizer, but if you want yours to stay pristine white, you might want to invest in one. Step 4: Once your wax is melted pour out of melt pot into the pour pot. Add scent as you normally would, but do not color. The first layer will be the top of your candle so you want to leave it white. Pour to the ⅓ mark of your mold. (I have my molds marked to where they should be poured too with a magic marker on the outside of the mold as you can see in the previous picture of my molds) Step 5: You will most likely have some wax left over from this first pour. This wax will be used again in the 3rd layer, so you can either set aside in your pour pot to melt later, or pour into embed molds. I like to pour mine into embed molds. Clean out your pour pot with paper towels to prepare for the second layer Step 6: While you first layer is setting up to be firm enough to hold the 2nd layer, now I weigh out my second layer wax and scent. Also prepare to color this layer orange. Once the first layer is ready to hold the second layer and your wax is melted, pour into your pour pot, scent and color. I use 1-2 drops (2 drops MAX) for this. The wax I use takes color very well, and if I use more than the 2 drops the middle orange layer gets way too dark. For these candles, I used 1 drop. This second layer (using the molds I use) will use all of this 8oz of wax, so no need to pour any extra into an embed mold. (See Step 10 if you have leftover wax) Step 7: Get ready for your 3rd layer. Your layers should look like this before pouring the next layer - For your third layer, repeat Step 6, but add the leftover wax from your first pour as well. Color with yellow and pour (I use 2 drops since yellow is a lighter color) Step 8: When your 3rd layer is set enough, poke relief holes Step 9: Once the candle is solid enough - finish off your candle with a repour. I take my wick bars off to do my repour, it makes it much easier and smoother so not as much leveling needs to be done at the end. Step 10: Set aside and let cool. You can either let them cool naturally, or after they are solid but still warm, you can place them in the refrigerator for a few minutes. If I am making a lot and on a deadline, I will place them in the refrigerator, if not, I let them cool naturally. Just do not freeze them. They could crack and split at the layers. Once the re-pour is done, if you still have wax left over (I never do at this point) you can pour it into an embed mold or tart molds to make wax melts. Step 12: Once cool, trim excess wick from taking the wick bar off, but don’t un-mold yet. - This part of the candle will most likely be bumpy and/or uneven. Warm a griddle (or whatever you normally use to level your candles) and level the candle. Clean griddle with a paper towel. Once that is done, undo wick and un-mold candle. For mine, it is sometimes difficult to get the slip knot untied, due to leaking wax or being too tightly tied, so I use a pair of pliers to untie the slip knot in the wick. Step 13: CONGRATULATIONS - At this point you should have beautiful Candy Corn scented pillar candles. The only step left now is to trim wicks, take a pic, post it, and enjoy the accolades of your beautiful creation!
  21. Hi all - I have a consistent problem with a few fragrances. I've been reading some help guides but not sure what is considered a drowning wick. There is one scenario where it says it's consuming too much wax so wick down, and another where it says it's drowning so wick up. How do I tell, Is this considered a drowning wick? This fragrance is orange and goji berry. It is running 2 x HTP 73's. The melt pool is half an inch in this picture. It burnt great, with a melt pool over an inch when we first lit it. Now just under half way it's died out. I get the same issue with Vanilla, Leather and Sandlewood and the French Pear. All do the same, just at different points. The coconut and lime seemed to burn fine, it was perfect with 2 X HTP 72s
  22. Hi all I was just doing some reading and stumbled across a post on tempering soy wax. It didn't mention the benefits and whether or not you should temper paraffin. Can someone tell me what the benefits of tempering the wax, and can you temper paraffin. Particularly IGI 4627?
  23. Hi All, Casting around for a theory here, cause I can't work it out... Last year I made up a batch of 50/50 paraffin/ palm wax container candles, using an Orange Essential Oil. Lucky thing we are supreme testers around here, because after a week or so, I did a test burn on a couple & they caught fire O-O The whole surface/ melt pool ignited after about the first 20 mins or so. Obviously, I had flash point issues & heaven only knows what else. So, I boxed the rest with the intention of removing/ piffing the wax & at least salvaging my glasses. Fast forward about 8 or 9 months & I did a spring clean. I lit one of these & was going to take photos & further notes & low & behold, it is burning PERFECTLY! I lit another- same! These are almost to their bottoms now, not a single issue. Burn time has been excellent & they are throwing like a dream. WTF???? At first I thought the EO must have "evaporated" out of the topish layer of wax (having sat around for so long) & that's why they were doing ok, but no, they're nearly done & they're all good. I am not selling these, obviously. Not risking it, but my point is that they are now the candles I was TRYING to make & even better than I had hoped at the time. Ideas about what's transpired Anyone???
  24. So, I experimented today and mixed some 4627 (40%) with GB444 (60%) Heated to 190 - added FO/dye at 185 - stirred about 2 minutes then poured into my glass jars. Which were sitting on a kitchen towel on the counter. (unheated jars) Since they have cooled I have a few cracks in the wax that go almost all the way around the candle. A little bit of glass separation too (not worried about that as much as the cracks). I have never had a candle crack before. I have also never used any form of paraffin either. I usually experiment with soy only. I'm trying to branch out and see what other waxes throw like. Suggestions for why I have the cracks?? Thanks for any responses!!
  25. Vicky_CO

    Wax dipped Roses

    Wax dipped roses
×