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Found 8 results

  1. Hey everyone, I've been experimenting more with silicon molds lately and have run into quite an annoying problem. Regardless of what I do, I can't get the scent from previous pours out of the molds. It continues to smell like the previous fragrances. Sometimes, even stained by dyes used as well. Its actually made me about give up on these darn things and go back to my normal stuff. But honestly... I've tried EVERYTHING and getting nowhere including: soap and water mold cleaner alcohol baking soda vinegar baby oil soaking overnight etc Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
  2. We have partnered with Soap Equipment to create a line of stock, printed boxes designed specifically to fit their soap molds. Printed on the same high-quality paper we use for our custom box packaging, these boxes are printed in soft colors with subtle, repeating patterns designed to blend in with your labels. We also added a soft touch matte coating to the box, a finish typically seen on higher-end product packaging. Our stock soap boxes increase your soaps perceived value by implying a quality, luxurious product resides within. These boxes are very economical, and retail ready – you just load and go! This program is new and constantly evolving. Our boxes currently fit a 2” x 1” x 3” soap bar. While the selection is limited right now, we will be creating larger boxes designed to fit bigger molds shortly, but we need your feedback on sizes, colors, styles, and if possible, particular molds, to determine where we go next. We can also supply labels to match these boxes – just ask us! We are looking for someone who can reach out to the soaping community as a Box Co-op representative to provide samples and gather information regarding trends, interests, and concerns in the community. In return we will provide soap packaging for your soaps. Please let us know if you’re interested. We’re looking to create stock soap boxes that fit the most used soap molds in the community. The Box Co-op has already partnered up with Soap Equipment to begin creating these mold specific boxes. BUT… we want to hear from you! What molds do you use? How many have you collected over the years? Hands down which is your favorite? Do you pick molds based on their cavity size, brand, or design? What other molds should we look into targeting? This is a new program we plan on rolling out so there are lots of kinks we’re working through. Your feedback is imperative to helping us settle this dust so we can launch!
  3. We have partnered with Soap Equipment to create a line of stock, printed boxes designed specifically to fit their soap molds. Printed on the same high-quality paper we use for our custom box packaging, these boxes are printed in soft colors with subtle, repeating patterns designed to blend in with your labels. We also added a soft touch matte coating to the box, a finish typically seen on higher-end product packaging. Our stock soap boxes increase your soaps perceived value by implying a quality, luxurious product resides within. These boxes are very economical, and retail ready – you just load and go! This program is new and constantly evolving. Our boxes currently fit a 2” x 1” x 3” soap bar. While the selection is limited right now, we will be creating larger boxes designed to fit bigger molds shortly, but we need your feedback on sizes, colors, styles, and if possible, particular molds, to determine where we go next. We can also supply labels to match these boxes – just ask us! We are looking for someone who can reach out to the soaping community as a Box Co-op representative to provide samples and gather information regarding trends, interests, and concerns in the community. In return we will provide soap packaging for your soaps. Please let us know if you’re interested. We’re looking to create stock soap boxes that fit the most used soap molds in the community. The Box Co-op has already partnered up with Soap Equipment to begin creating these mold specific boxes. BUT… we want to hear from you! What molds do you use? How many have you collected over the years? Hands down which is your favorite? Do you pick molds based on their cavity size, brand, or design? What other molds should we look into targeting? This is a new program we plan on rolling out so there are lots of kinks we’re working through. Your feedback is imperative to helping us settle this dust so we can launch!
  4. Hi there, i've read on several posts people either use the oven method and or a solution-based cleaning agent. I dont have wax buildup on the inside of my molds its more of like residue from the wax, and i am wondering the best way to get the molds "spotless" again. Would it be just as easy to use my heat gun and wipe or more of solution-type spray and wipe? any help would be great. Thanks
  5. where can i find a good deal price wise on silicone molds?
  6. Hello everyone! I'm starting to get into candlemaking, and I'm in the process of gathering up supplies and studying for my first go. I wanted to ask a couple of questions, though: 1. When I get the hang of this, I'd like to be able to make more than one candle at a time. I realize that I could just buy multiple single molds, but it seems that there should be tray-molds that would let you make more than one candle at a time. I'm sure these exist, but I don't know the lingo well enough to search for them, I think, because I can't find them. Any ideas where I could find something like this? 2. On that note, does anyone know where I could find small, emergency-candle sized molds? I've looked under several different names - chime candles, bell, shabbat, emergency, etc. - but can't seem to find them anywhere, either. Sorry about this, but I think I'm too much of a newb to know exactly how to look for what I'm wanting... any help would be greatly appreciated.
  7. Skill level - Beginner to intermediate due to the layering aspect and being familiar with pouring pillars Pillar wax – this can be any type of pillar wax – either a blend, or straight paraffin. *NOTE- I have used IGI4625 and MP140 Pre-production blend wax – both with very similar results. With a straight paraffin you might want to add some sort of additives to keep it from mottling or being too rustic looking. You want them to be smooth and creamy looking. – I have never made these using a soy blend or straight soy so I cannot speak to the outcome, but I see no reason why it wouldn’t work with soy. As long as it’s a pillar wax – and can be molded.Mold – any metal pillar mold will work – I do not recommend plastic or polycarbonate molds as the scent tends to pit the plastic - I am using a conical metal mold for this due to the shape, it better represents a candy corn I believe. Wick - however you would normally wick the mold you are using, and whatever wick size works for the size candle you are making with the type of wax you are using is the wick you want to use. (to wick my molds, I use flat braided wicks and a homemade “jiffy wicker” system - explained within this tutorial) Scent - optional - I like my candy corns to smell like a candy corn so I will be using a Honey Vanilla/Candy Corn scent I get from Candles and SuppliesCandle Dye - I find that liquid candle dyes work much better due to the fluid nature of the liquids vs. blocks that you have to melt. The blocks don’t disperse nearly as easily.Melt pot - this can be a double boiler or a presto pot. Whatever you are familiar with using to melt your wax.Pour pot - this is whatever you normally use to pour your wax into your mold with. If you use your presto pot for this, it might be easier to get/make and use a separate pour pot.Scale - to weigh out the wax you need and also scent if you use it.Additives - this is optional - only use additives if you normally use additives for your particular pillar wax you have chosen to use.*NOTE - I will be using the MP140 Pre-production wax for this tutorial which is a paraffin blend that requires no additives, so I will skip this part. If you are using additives, add them whenever you normally would for your pillars.Stir stick - To stir wax, scent and color. I use the handle of a wooden spoon. I’ve been using it for 14 years, and it hasn’t failed me yet. Skewer - To poke relief holes Heat Gun - Optional - it’s handy for cleanupGriddle or leveler - to level candle while still in moldPaper towels - optional but very helpful for clean-upEmbed or tart mold(s) - optional but can be helpfulPliers - optional - I need them to undo the wick from the mold once the candle is ready to be unmolded Step 1: Weigh out your wax. Weigh out enough to fill your mold ⅓ of the way. I am going to be making 3 pillars at a time. For measuring purposes and ease of scenting each layer, I will use 8 oz of wax. Because each layer is a different color, I will be weighing out, melting and pouring 8oz of wax 3 times. Add wax to your melt pot and melt wax Step 2: As your wax is melting, weigh out your scent and set aside. Also prep your mold with wick. Since this is 8oz wax, I will be using .5 oz scent. Here is the homemade jiffy wicker system I use for wicking my pillars. It’s easy to make, just create a slip knot at one end of the wicking, so when pulling the long end it does not come undone, use a piece of craft foam cut into a square, and a wick tab.Then thread them all together. It will end up at the bottom of the mold and I put a wick bar across the top of the mold to secure the wick. Step 3: Determine your colors and get them ready. I use Peaks liquid candle dyes. For this particular candle I am using the following colors - Orange and Yellow. For the white, I am not using any color for the wax. Beware - this is a vanilla scent and can discolor your wax. Over the years, I have had them go to a darker off-white color but never anything darker than that. I don’t bother with a stabilizer, but if you want yours to stay pristine white, you might want to invest in one. Step 4: Once your wax is melted pour out of melt pot into the pour pot. Add scent as you normally would, but do not color. The first layer will be the top of your candle so you want to leave it white. Pour to the ⅓ mark of your mold. (I have my molds marked to where they should be poured too with a magic marker on the outside of the mold as you can see in the previous picture of my molds) Step 5: You will most likely have some wax left over from this first pour. This wax will be used again in the 3rd layer, so you can either set aside in your pour pot to melt later, or pour into embed molds. I like to pour mine into embed molds. Clean out your pour pot with paper towels to prepare for the second layer Step 6: While you first layer is setting up to be firm enough to hold the 2nd layer, now I weigh out my second layer wax and scent. Also prepare to color this layer orange. Once the first layer is ready to hold the second layer and your wax is melted, pour into your pour pot, scent and color. I use 1-2 drops (2 drops MAX) for this. The wax I use takes color very well, and if I use more than the 2 drops the middle orange layer gets way too dark. For these candles, I used 1 drop. This second layer (using the molds I use) will use all of this 8oz of wax, so no need to pour any extra into an embed mold. (See Step 10 if you have leftover wax) Step 7: Get ready for your 3rd layer. Your layers should look like this before pouring the next layer - For your third layer, repeat Step 6, but add the leftover wax from your first pour as well. Color with yellow and pour (I use 2 drops since yellow is a lighter color) Step 8: When your 3rd layer is set enough, poke relief holes Step 9: Once the candle is solid enough - finish off your candle with a repour. I take my wick bars off to do my repour, it makes it much easier and smoother so not as much leveling needs to be done at the end. Step 10: Set aside and let cool. You can either let them cool naturally, or after they are solid but still warm, you can place them in the refrigerator for a few minutes. If I am making a lot and on a deadline, I will place them in the refrigerator, if not, I let them cool naturally. Just do not freeze them. They could crack and split at the layers. Once the re-pour is done, if you still have wax left over (I never do at this point) you can pour it into an embed mold or tart molds to make wax melts. Step 12: Once cool, trim excess wick from taking the wick bar off, but don’t un-mold yet. - This part of the candle will most likely be bumpy and/or uneven. Warm a griddle (or whatever you normally use to level your candles) and level the candle. Clean griddle with a paper towel. Once that is done, undo wick and un-mold candle. For mine, it is sometimes difficult to get the slip knot untied, due to leaking wax or being too tightly tied, so I use a pair of pliers to untie the slip knot in the wick. Step 13: CONGRATULATIONS - At this point you should have beautiful Candy Corn scented pillar candles. The only step left now is to trim wicks, take a pic, post it, and enjoy the accolades of your beautiful creation! Click here to view the article
  8. Skill level - Beginner to intermediate due to the layering aspect and being familiar with pouring pillars Pillar wax – this can be any type of pillar wax – either a blend, or straight paraffin. *NOTE- I have used IGI4625 and MP140 Pre-production blend wax – both with very similar results. With a straight paraffin you might want to add some sort of additives to keep it from mottling or being too rustic looking. You want them to be smooth and creamy looking. – I have never made these using a soy blend or straight soy so I cannot speak to the outcome, but I see no reason why it wouldn’t work with soy. As long as it’s a pillar wax – and can be molded. Mold – any metal pillar mold will work – I do not recommend plastic or polycarbonate molds as the scent tends to pit the plastic - I am using a conical metal mold for this due to the shape, it better represents a candy corn I believe. Wick - however you would normally wick the mold you are using, and whatever wick size works for the size candle you are making with the type of wax you are using is the wick you want to use. (to wick my molds, I use flat braided wicks and a homemade “jiffy wicker” system - explained within this tutorial) Scent - optional - I like my candy corns to smell like a candy corn so I will be using a Honey Vanilla/Candy Corn scent I get from Candles and Supplies Candle Dye - I find that liquid candle dyes work much better due to the fluid nature of the liquids vs. blocks that you have to melt. The blocks don’t disperse nearly as easily. Melt pot - this can be a double boiler or a presto pot. Whatever you are familiar with using to melt your wax. Pour pot - this is whatever you normally use to pour your wax into your mold with. If you use your presto pot for this, it might be easier to get/make and use a separate pour pot. Scale - to weigh out the wax you need and also scent if you use it. Additives - this is optional - only use additives if you normally use additives for your particular pillar wax you have chosen to use.*NOTE - I will be using the MP140 Pre-production wax for this tutorial which is a paraffin blend that requires no additives, so I will skip this part. If you are using additives, add them whenever you normally would for your pillars. Stir stick - To stir wax, scent and color. I use the handle of a wooden spoon. I’ve been using it for 14 years, and it hasn’t failed me yet. Skewer - To poke relief holes Heat Gun - Optional - it’s handy for cleanup Griddle or leveler - to level candle while still in mold Paper towels - optional but very helpful for clean-up Embed or tart mold(s) - optional but can be helpful Pliers - optional - I need them to undo the wick from the mold once the candle is ready to be unmolded Step 1: Weigh out your wax. Weigh out enough to fill your mold ⅓ of the way. I am going to be making 3 pillars at a time. For measuring purposes and ease of scenting each layer, I will use 8 oz of wax. Because each layer is a different color, I will be weighing out, melting and pouring 8oz of wax 3 times. Add wax to your melt pot and melt wax Step 2: As your wax is melting, weigh out your scent and set aside. Also prep your mold with wick. Since this is 8oz wax, I will be using .5 oz scent. Here is the homemade jiffy wicker system I use for wicking my pillars. It’s easy to make, just create a slip knot at one end of the wicking, so when pulling the long end it does not come undone, use a piece of craft foam cut into a square, and a wick tab.Then thread them all together. It will end up at the bottom of the mold and I put a wick bar across the top of the mold to secure the wick. Step 3: Determine your colors and get them ready. I use Peaks liquid candle dyes. For this particular candle I am using the following colors - Orange and Yellow. For the white, I am not using any color for the wax. Beware - this is a vanilla scent and can discolor your wax. Over the years, I have had them go to a darker off-white color but never anything darker than that. I don’t bother with a stabilizer, but if you want yours to stay pristine white, you might want to invest in one. Step 4: Once your wax is melted pour out of melt pot into the pour pot. Add scent as you normally would, but do not color. The first layer will be the top of your candle so you want to leave it white. Pour to the ⅓ mark of your mold. (I have my molds marked to where they should be poured too with a magic marker on the outside of the mold as you can see in the previous picture of my molds) Step 5: You will most likely have some wax left over from this first pour. This wax will be used again in the 3rd layer, so you can either set aside in your pour pot to melt later, or pour into embed molds. I like to pour mine into embed molds. Clean out your pour pot with paper towels to prepare for the second layer Step 6: While you first layer is setting up to be firm enough to hold the 2nd layer, now I weigh out my second layer wax and scent. Also prepare to color this layer orange. Once the first layer is ready to hold the second layer and your wax is melted, pour into your pour pot, scent and color. I use 1-2 drops (2 drops MAX) for this. The wax I use takes color very well, and if I use more than the 2 drops the middle orange layer gets way too dark. For these candles, I used 1 drop. This second layer (using the molds I use) will use all of this 8oz of wax, so no need to pour any extra into an embed mold. (See Step 10 if you have leftover wax) Step 7: Get ready for your 3rd layer. Your layers should look like this before pouring the next layer - For your third layer, repeat Step 6, but add the leftover wax from your first pour as well. Color with yellow and pour (I use 2 drops since yellow is a lighter color) Step 8: When your 3rd layer is set enough, poke relief holes Step 9: Once the candle is solid enough - finish off your candle with a repour. I take my wick bars off to do my repour, it makes it much easier and smoother so not as much leveling needs to be done at the end. Step 10: Set aside and let cool. You can either let them cool naturally, or after they are solid but still warm, you can place them in the refrigerator for a few minutes. If I am making a lot and on a deadline, I will place them in the refrigerator, if not, I let them cool naturally. Just do not freeze them. They could crack and split at the layers. Once the re-pour is done, if you still have wax left over (I never do at this point) you can pour it into an embed mold or tart molds to make wax melts. Step 12: Once cool, trim excess wick from taking the wick bar off, but don’t un-mold yet. - This part of the candle will most likely be bumpy and/or uneven. Warm a griddle (or whatever you normally use to level your candles) and level the candle. Clean griddle with a paper towel. Once that is done, undo wick and un-mold candle. For mine, it is sometimes difficult to get the slip knot untied, due to leaking wax or being too tightly tied, so I use a pair of pliers to untie the slip knot in the wick. Step 13: CONGRATULATIONS - At this point you should have beautiful Candy Corn scented pillar candles. The only step left now is to trim wicks, take a pic, post it, and enjoy the accolades of your beautiful creation!
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