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TallTayl

The Ones Who Keep The Lights On
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Everything posted by TallTayl

  1. While learning surfactants for hair products, cationic became super important as the positively charged cationic ingredients “stick” to negatively charged damaged hair strands. Cationic Guar became my new best friend. But I digress. with surfactants (which emulsifiers are a type of surfactant) blending negatively charged/anionic with cationic in the wrong proportions can cause separation. This is true for lotions too. For instance too much sodium steroyl lactylate (part of the popular Ecomulse/RitaMulse SCG ) can cause lotion curdling and separation.
  2. Double wicking is a super challenge in small containers like those. I would not double wick a tin generally. when I used C3 in those tins cd were my go to for most scents. Cd 12 - cd 18 depending on the fragrance. I never went above 9% fo, usually stuck to 8%. fragrance sold retail is becoming super challenging too. Supply chain issues combined with reformulation to meet customer cost expectations changed a lot of how people wick. Every scent an every container needs a full test from top to bottom before releasing into the wild. c3 needs at least a week before test burning. 2 weeks is better. 6006will need much less wick. @bfroberts can help dial you in. Double wicking 6006 in a in will likely get you into trouble with container temps. I would put plans to launch on hold until you have mastered the wax you choose. You never get a second chance to make a first impression. Too many people jump the gun and regret it. Make candles for the love of it, and if it is what is meant to be it will happen.
  3. Micro waxes are a BIG class of product. Basically, they are like a super small moleculeversion of petroleum based wax used to “fill in holes” between other wax molecules. it can raise or lower melt points of the other waxes in the blend you use. It can be a plasticizer, can change viscosity of the melted wax, or harden wax. The effects of micro waxes and polymers (like vybar and polyboost products) change how the candles set up and cools down and handle changes to ambient temps and humidity. In the case of some naked soy waxes I use, it can control or minimize the granular appearance that forms over time as the soy molecules dry and grow through normal crystallization. Too little does nothing. Too much can ruin a perfectly good burn. The tolerances are quite low in most waxes, like fractions of a %. in your melts I would say the micro wax will do little depending on the problem you are trying to fix. but I always advocate trying it out to learn from the proces. @Brad Ford of Clarus has been so kind through the years to spend time explaining these products on the phone. Maybe he will see this call out and reply to correct my undetailed understanding. here’s a fun link I learned a lot from: https://igiwax.com/wp-content/uploads/bsk-pdf-manager/NCA_Presentation-Microcrystalline_Wax_use_in_Candles_6.pdf and a link to a producer. Note the melt point and softness have no direct link. A soft micro wax can have a high melt point and Vice Versa. https://blendedwaxes.com/product/microcrystalline-wax/
  4. This sounds like the original candle was not wicked well. to flatten the top of a pillar I would use a hot plate to melt it smooth. Heat a hot flat surface, like a pancake griddle, just hot enough to melt a layer of the wax. Move the candle around on the hot plate back and forth and in circular patterns to control how the candle melts. Let cool completely, trim the wick and try a test burn within sight.
  5. Welcome to craftserver. Very sorry for your losses. c3 is a very nice wax. CD or ECO wicks should do the trick. The size will depend on your fragrance, fragrance load, any additives and container used. You can swap out wicks to test using a “wickectomy”. ALL waxes have different wick needs depending on the container, fragrance, color and exact box of wax you have. It takes time to figure out which wick no matter the wax. 6006 burns much easier than C3, an can easily get too hot if not careful. Small sizes of Cd, eco, and some zinc usually work in that wax. if you can share the exact size / dimensions and shape of the jar you use narrowing down the wicks needed will be easier. No matter what someone here (or on wick charts) suggests, though, you will need to test from top to bottom in typical and power burns, before producing, test each combo from top to bottom to ensure the candle will burn safely. The top of the candle buns different from the bottom half. Wick for the bottom half, not the top to prevent safety issues for your future customers.
  6. You will need to test the fo compatibility with the bag material to make sure it does not eat through. Squishing should work well, and is kind of fun. if it is pourable all the better. my creams go in a jar, so I measure in to a jar, then add scent and swirl it around for singles. Have you ever seen the boil-able spout bags like brambleberry uses? If you lotion needed heating it would be perfect! They come in many sizes. BB used to sell them, spoutpak has many now on Amazon and Ebay. I don’t see why you couldn’t use a different seal. I just aim for the freezer type for the thickness and durability. Squeezing a bag that is too thin can lead to a messy blowout.
  7. I thought it was for use on top of the dish so the dish itself is easier to clean?
  8. Well, someone has to pay the freight. Since wholesale orders are already getting a nice discount, free shipping on top of that is only hurting myself. You can play games with numbers to appease them into thinking they are getting a “deal”, but at the end of the day it is a shell game. You can raise all prices to make the WS % work, but then everyone else you sell to is subsidizing the shipping of another customer. The $20 a case to NY would work out to, what, $1 a candle? They can tack that, plus a few extra on top of the normal markup $ and make a healthy profit. if the WS customer is not willing to foot the freight bill, then it’s not worth it to me either. Let them work with someone closer. I prefer to not work for free. Time is the one and only resource that is limited. I can’t make more of it. What I have left is precious. If you want to extend your reach, maybe look into FedEx accounts. Sometimes their less than load, less than pallet freight savings are worth it. Sometimes. freight on large orders for us got to be too much practically overnight. When plywood went from$20 a sheet to hundreds it made pallet packing like $1,000. No way I want to cover that and give discounts. It was time to suspend that part of the operation and focus elsewhere for a while.
  9. @NightLightis correct, I store the lotion in gallon Freezer bags on the shop shelf, NOT in the freezer. I used to contract manufacture scented lotion. I convinced the customers to purchase gallons or 5 gallon containers from essentials by Catalina versus making my own and learned a few great lessons. It was a messy pain in the tuckus to scoop out from the containers and into the final jars/bottles, with lots of waste. And the containers being scooped were prime for contamination. Bigger containers more easily developed mold and that weird skin on top from being exposed to the air inside the pail. condensation always forms where there is an air gap. Reusing the pails will always be a vector for future contamination, even with bleaching or star San as you can’t ever get it “all” out from the last batch. the zip bags act like piping bags to quickly and cleanly fill the final containers. I just snip a corner and precision pour into the funnel or jar opening. Sooooo much easier. And fewer storage containers to wash and sanitize.
  10. The only waxes I leave on are beeswax and bayberry. I find other waxes break down if left on too long and develop an off odor. the good news is coconut waxes melt really fast. My bee and bayberry take most of the day to fully melt if starting from scratch. I also have a water jacket melter. I left soy wax on over night to melt so I could make candles in the morning and it was a smelly mess.
  11. I got really cozy with boxes, pirate ship and go shippo to pack test configurations and charge accordingly. In my case, shipping by weight was the closest to not lose money on shipping. USPS has regional rate boxes which save a nice amount for shipping to nearby states. Flat rate has gotten spendy. the "cubic rate" promoted by Pirate Ship is the same cost usually as regional rates or any first class size box. UPS and FedEx are nice options for larger / heavier orders. Both are offered through Pirate Ship and FedEx now. Even though many boxes are "free" from usps there is the hidden cost of about $.40 in their rates. I build in the cost of boxes, void fill, tape, etc. into my item pricing and a small handling fee of less than $1 to cover miscalculations of shipping by the shopping carts. I charge by weight and to an extent dim weight (accounts for larger boxes that cost more to ship through all carriers. Shipping is my biggest cost, and I don't want to give up any of that as it steals from profit. The increases this year have hit hard.
  12. In a 2.5 inch jar my waxes and scents can use anywhere from eco .5 - 4. for a 3" jar in a soft coco that is in the same neighborhood as 6006 an eco 1 or 1.5 fits well and can throw with gusto. A few need a 2 or 4 just to stay lit. for comparison, I'm burning a 1 in a 2.5" with a citrus patchouli blend that is shockingly strong compared to other wicks and maintaining a small stable flame, even in the last 1/4. It is possible less FO will help, but since you already have that one in hand it is quick to swap wicks out for instant gratification. Lilac is usually nauseatingly strong at that %, so it sounds like a wick series issue. You just need to find that magic sweet spot of consumption vs flame temp to coax out what is there. Did it smell strong as you poured it? and... did it have a cure time? Is this a new box of 6006? if not, does it perform as it should with other scents? New FO? Has it been reformulated?
  13. there was a fad for a while of Ice Candles. People would fill a pillar mold with ice, pour in the hot wax and cool. The ice would, of course, melt, leaving behind voids like swiss cheese. Never heard anything about how they burned, but never heard of a fire incident, so hopefully a little water in a paraffin wax would not be too dangerous.
  14. you've hit the nail on the head. THe polymers used in retail waxes have a narrow margin of error. Too much - even a fraction of an oz in a batch - can make the wax look plastic or wiggly when cooled. Dilution is the solution. It happens in veg blends too occasionally. It's a good idea to keep a stash of "naked" waxes around to help fix those issues when they pop up.
  15. Copied and pasted my reply from the other thread here: I've seen moisture in paraffin and soy (and other veg) waxes. In veg waxes moisture can be introduced during hydrogenation. Or condensation. I heard of one retailer that stores cases in a freezer. Those moisture droplets inside the bag form as it thaws. In paraffin it should at least stay to the bottom of the pour pot. Often you can see the little droplets at the bottom of the pot. Sometimes you can heat and hold long enough to get them to evaporate. In soy wax (made of hydrogenated vegetable oils) moisture has more of a tendency to stay homogenous in the mix, so it s harder to eradicate. Heat and hold, or heat / cool / heat can help. Wet flakes in a new case can sometimes be evaporated off by leaving the case open for a while in a cool, dry room. Mix around to allow air to circulate through the whole case. What a pain either way.
  16. I've seen moisture in paraffin and soy (and other veg) waxes. In veg waxes moisture can be introduced during hydrogenation. Or condensation. I heard of one retailer that stores cases in a freezer. Those moisture droplets inside the bag form as it thaws. In paraffin it should at least stay to the bottom of the pour pot. Often you can see the little droplets at the bottom of the pot. Sometimes you can heat and hold long enough to get them to evaporate. In soy wax (made of hydrogenated vegetable oils) moisture has more of a tendency to stay homogenous in the mix, so it s harder to eradicate. Heat and hold, or heat / cool / heat can help. Wet flakes in a new case can sometimes be evaporated off by leaving the case open for a while in a cool, dry room. Mix around to allow air to circulate through the whole case. What a pain either way.
  17. What didn’t work about it?
  18. Have you ever tried very small eco?
  19. The best dragons blood I ever found was from the scent works which closed a decade ago. I had theirs duped by my lab. It smells like the resin when you soak it in perfumers alcohol to make perfume. I can send you a sniffy if you want. Send me a PM with your address and I’ll put one in the mail.
  20. It’s really hard to say from pics. The camera always makes them look not “true”. you could also try different wood but same sizes. Not sure what they offer these days but I have sets of different colored wood that burns different enough. darker woods leak tannins into the molten wax. Lighter woods do not seem to be as bad.
  21. Wood wicks are dirty for sure, but those appear over wicked as well. If the problems begin around the half way point that is usually the cause. wick for the bottom half of the candle, not the top half.
  22. Fragrances are ordered in different concentrations from the compounder / lab. "watered down" is just a slang term for perceived smell strength based on a weak concentration of aromachemical molecules in the bottle/keg. I can order my fragrances from the lab in any concentration I wish, with prices per keg varying with the concentrations. The rest of the bottle content is diluent, such as DOA, DEP, IPM, etc. A bottle of pure aromachemicals would be a) extremely costly and b) very difficult (and downright dangerous) for most home crafters to use. Save on Scents offers their FO in three different concentrations, for example. Most retailers order one for simplicity and best price.
  23. I REALLY wish FO retailers would add (accurate) LOT numbers to the bottles. It would minimize all of this frustration.
  24. That size and shape jar will, at most, support double wicks. multiple wicks generate exponentially more heat. You can try cd3 or 4, but my gut and experience says those will not be able to consume the melted wax in balance with the heat generated which is melting the wax. This throws the cycle out of whack. pull one of those cd6 and see if the double will work. Play with the spacing to keep a balanced pool. Always keep wicks away from the outer third of the jar to minimize glass breakage during a burn. another trick with soy is to try the CDN series. In soy they burn a bit cooler than cd of the same size. CDN have an extra chemical treatment which keeps them viable in some waxes and fo with high acid value. In all of my burn tests, they burn hotter than their CD companion in coconut type blends, but a bit on the cooler side in soy if they stay lit.
  25. I store in gallon zip lock freezer bags. This way I can squeeze out the extra air to prevent condensation and oxidation. This allows me to scent on demand versus keep lots of excess lotion on hand in scents that may or may not sell.
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