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Sara

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About Sara

  • Rank
    Retired Admin

Converted

  • Makes
    candles soap
  • Location
    Wisconsin
  • Occupation
    soaper, chandler, mom
  • Likes / Dislikes
    Likes: I love teas, coffees, books, dark chocolate. Love pens (especially "business" pens from hotels and such). Enjoy knitting. Favorite color is pink. Like dragonflies. Homemade soap.

    Dislikes: flavored coffees

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  1. Rainbow/Layered Melt & Pour Soap By Sara Making the Soap This tutorial is written assuming you have the basic hang of making melt and pour soaps and are ready to try some different techniques. Supplies Needed Melt and pour soap Mold (a rectangular or loaf pan is best for this type of soap make sure it is clean and able to withstand the heat of the soap) Fragrance, if desired (I used the same fragrance with all layers) Soap-safe colors witch hazel (in spritzer) microwave-safe bowl (preferably a glass measuring cup, Pyrex, for example) spoon or chopstick to stir scale First figure out how much soap you need for your mold. Fill the mold with water, then measure the amount of water needed to fill it up. A lined, glass measuring cup works well. If you have 24oz. of water, that will give you a rough idea of how much soap you will need. My mold holds 3 pounds of soap. We will use this amount for the tutorial and make six 8oz. layers. You might want to spray the mold with Crisco, or a light coating of petroleum jelly. Heat your soap, let it cool again until a skin forms on top, then gently stir that in, scent/color as desire and pour into the prepared mold. A quick spritz with alcohol will deter bubbles. While that layer is firming up, prepare the same amount of soap for the next layer. You don't want to pour your layers too hot or the fresh soap will melt the lower layer and "bleeding" will occur. When the first layer is firm and has formed a nice skin on it, pour the prepared 2nd layer over. I poured mine over the back of a spoon, being gentle not to disturb the first layer. Sometimes it helps to pour closer to the edges where the soap is more firm. Continue this process until all layers are poured. The soap will take a while to set up completely. You can speed up the process by putting it in the refrigerator. Cut and enjoy!! Click here to view the article
  2. Rainbow/Layered Melt & Pour Soap By Sara Making the Soap This tutorial is written assuming you have the basic hang of making melt and pour soaps and are ready to try some different techniques. Supplies Needed Melt and pour soap Mold (a rectangular or loaf pan is best for this type of soap make sure it is clean and able to withstand the heat of the soap) Fragrance, if desired (I used the same fragrance with all layers) Soap-safe colors witch hazel (in spritzer) microwave-safe bowl (preferably a glass measuring cup, Pyrex, for example) spoon or chopstick to stir scale First figure out how much soap you need for your mold. Fill the mold with water, then measure the amount of water needed to fill it up. A lined, glass measuring cup works well. If you have 24oz. of water, that will give you a rough idea of how much soap you will need. My mold holds 3 pounds of soap. We will use this amount for the tutorial and make six 8oz. layers. You might want to spray the mold with Crisco, or a light coating of petroleum jelly. Heat your soap, let it cool again until a skin forms on top, then gently stir that in, scent/color as desire and pour into the prepared mold. A quick spritz with alcohol will deter bubbles. While that layer is firming up, prepare the same amount of soap for the next layer. You don't want to pour your layers too hot or the fresh soap will melt the lower layer and "bleeding" will occur. When the first layer is firm and has formed a nice skin on it, pour the prepared 2nd layer over. I poured mine over the back of a spoon, being gentle not to disturb the first layer. Sometimes it helps to pour closer to the edges where the soap is more firm. Continue this process until all layers are poured. The soap will take a while to set up completely. You can speed up the process by putting it in the refrigerator. Cut and enjoy!!
  3. Yowch! I don't have a reaction like that, but when I use lip products with beeswax in them, I slowly get a reaction (burning, stinging lips). It took me a bit to figure out the culprit. Some are worse than others, and after reading this thread, I'm wondering if the ones with the peppermint and beeswax just put me over the top.
  4. Yup - sorry for delay. Added you.

  5. Hi Sara,

    How do I get access to the political section? Thanks!

  6. Hi Sara,

    Is it okay to post a message to the group in Vegetable Wax Candles to see if anyone is interested in donating a How to candle towards the 2nd edition of my book?

    Thank you,

    Jameel

  7. It appears you may have gotten off on the wrong foot. The forum rules are there for the benefit of the members. If you have questions or concerns regarding the rules, you are more than welcome to contact me at mail@craftserver.com - they will not be addressed on the forum, however. Peak is a major supporter of CT, among others who support the site by who have taken out ad campaigns, or purchasing member subscriptions. If candlemaking.com is interested in doing the same, please contact me at the address given. The forum, as pointed out, should not be used by a supplier for customer service, or to sell items on their website. Apologies to the OP for the thread hijack.
  8. Yeah, putting the beer name on the label could be helpful if there's a certain market you're aiming for. Another idea... I was at a local micro-brewery and a soaper had made bars with their specific beer and was selling them there. I don't know if you have any local breweries, but using local might be a nice niche.
  9. I've resorted to oodles of curling ribbons because I'm bow-impaired too.
  10. My problem has always been the temperamental, humid weather here. I didn't have the patience to stick with making these puppies. But reading this gets me inspired to try again now that it is getting cooler out.
  11. Jenny, welcome to the forum. Everyone has their own preferences to scents, waxes, suppliers, etc. - the more you read and test, the more you will know what you like. You can start out by posting what your working with (wax/fo/wicks) and what outcome you are getting, and where you want to take it.
  12. Jola, what is the coaster made from? I can see the print on it - is it magazines or newspapers or something?
  13. I wear regular glasses with goggles over them, absolutely. It is super scary, some of the stories (and just letting imagination run wild)!! I've been pretty fortunate, but back when I first started making soap, I was coming up the stairs and almost tripped (I have a tendency to trip up stairs). After I caught my footing, I stood still for a bit, just breathing and centering myself - it could have been a bad fall; I was fortunate.
  14. LOL. Well that's gotta count for something, right?
  15. Interesting. It is a rather expensive hobby, if it is all for play, that's for sure. As long as costs are covered, all is well (for me), but if costs weren't even covered, I couldn't justify the expense to our family budget. There's a couple of you who say it is all business and no play. Does that mean it isn't fun, either? I wonder how many would continue, for business, even if it were not pleasurable at all. Not to say people don't work every day without enjoying it - they do it for the money. But making candles/crafting for pay is different than busing tables, etc.
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