Jump to content

Candlefriends

Registered Users Plus
  • Content Count

    39
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

10 Good

About Candlefriends

  • Rank
    Member

Converted

  • Makes
    candles

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Thank you for examples BusyBee! The little bubbles I'm not too worried about, and really I only see maybe 1-2 little bubbles in my candles. Most of them don't have any which I'm happy about. The bubble issue I was referring to are within my relief holes while I refill them. I think I have a solution to release them to the surface - I need to try it.:). Thanks again.
  2. Hi Hometown Handmades! I'm not an expert yet here either and new to this method. While soy wax is great, it has a tendency to create serious imperfections and burn quality issues in candles. (Most famously, sink-holes, uneven surfaces, wet-spots and cracking). This usually has to do with the wax cooling too quickly and pouring temp. problems. These flaws are very common in soy wax and are considered part of the craft. Relief holes are holes intentionally punched deep and around the wick after complete cooling. They are then filled back in by a second pour or using a heat gun. Basically, they are methods to "repair a candle". In basic understanding, the relief hole method helps release air trapped within wax, fix cracks and fill-in any large air pockets i.e. sink-holes. (Sink-holes can ruin an entire candle within minutes as you often can not see them and they cause the wick to sink and drown out). Many candle makers use this method just to make sure there is nothing wrong with the candle. It has worked well for me and many others. There are lots of videos on this method and besides here CandleScience has helped me tons in technical questions. Hope this helps.
  3. Hey I'm glad you figured it out! Again, our coconut waxes and soy lots# are probably different so I'm sure those played a big factor in ratios and technique. Glad to help anytime.
  4. So I'm blending the Coconut 83 w/ GW 464 soy, 60/40 ratio. I let the candles rest 1 day, and pour 2.5 oz. on top the second day. I poke 4-5 holes around the wick using a skewer. I jab it pretty good to the bottom. Sometimes it seems that the air is still trapped while pouring (I see a little bubble). While burning, the holes appear, disappear, and then reappear in different burn cycles. Is this weird??? They seem to be fine other than aesthetics. No sinking or cracking. When I do the second pour the wax is pretty hot. Thanks! 😊 😁!
  5. Hi everyone, Quick question... When I do my second pour to fill relief holes, I'm noticing that sometimes they are not filled completely and reappear during my candle burn. How do I prevent this? Thanks! 😊
  6. Hi ErronB, While I don't use NW Coconut wax, it sounds like that you are having similar issues I had with Coconut 83. I know it can be frustrating and expensive. Your wick collection is kinda like mine. I've had the most improvement with CDN 8, CD 7 CW 20 and 30 with 3" diameter. There is a lot of hang up w/ CD7 and CW 20; it does catch up quickly. Honestly, I never could get away from some sooting and inconsistencies with long burns using straight coconut 83. (White containers don't hide the truth). They only way to get them to burn somewhat well were trimming wicks really short and even then the last 10-12 hours of the candle were not great. I know this is disappointing to hear, but the only way I was able to really good burn was by blending the wax upto 40/60 and 50/50 with soy. With the wicks mentioned above, I've really tested my candles by "abusing" them like a buyer would. (Loooong burns, short burns, not trimming and drafty areas). With this blend, I do have some cracking blemishes that I need to fix initially, but they are burning successfully, no sooting, some carbon ball formation, HT is good, and they do look creamy in consistency. I hope you have better luck using straight NW coconut than I did with coconut 83. Hang in there!
  7. Thanks BusyBee! I've been saving boxes - ha, ha, ha! Colorado is challenging with temperatures. The weather here is a split personality. One day it's beautiful sunny 65+ and the next day 20's and snowing. The drastic temp. changes has helped me think about how to build my candle studio features to maintain a constant temp environment. Thanks again!
  8. Hi Dee, I just went through this myself - approx 2 months of testing and experimenting with different %s and wicks. As I'm fairly new to candle making myself. Many will recommend and I found out that you have to put quite of bit of soy into coconut to make it "wickable" and soot preventable. I don't get my coconut wax from NW, so the burn properties may vary somewhat. I do use GW 464 soy though. To give you a jump start I would try 70/30% coconut to soy and you will probably need to go up from there. You may also want to take into consideration - hot weather temps. Soft coconut will have a higher chance of melting during shipping. Soy will harden the wax even more and lessen the chances of that occurring. Wick sizes vary on your candle jar diameter and pay attention to your jars to see if they have a taper. The taper will make a difference in sizing. I found that CD and CDN wicks have worked the best for me. Others here found luck with or prefer a different type. Finally, be sure to experiment, the info above is a big leg up to get started. Be aware there is no quick and easy trick to candle making - as many of us here can attest to :)! I've learned a lot from trial and error and the help I've received here. Hopefully, this info works out for you!!! - Candlefriends
  9. Hi Everyone - I hope you all are doing well and staying healthy! With some extra free time I've been really been able to experiment with wax blends with much success. So I've bumped up my blend %'s quite a bit and the power burns are doing great at the 40/60. (40 GW 464 and 60 Coco 83). (Anything less in percentage failed the power burn test). This latest combo has no smoking/soot, mushrooming, and pretty calm flame during power burns. However, with so much soy, I am running into dipping and cracking around the wick, the tops are smooth. I don't get any sinkholes, but get the feeling that the flaw is similar and is just manifesting itself as cracks. This issue is new to me. (when I worked with soy in the past, it was in a different space and containers. I never had these problems). Until my workspace is built in my basement, I'm stuck in a open space kitchen / dining area that's pretty hard to control - it's cool and drafty. The containers I use are pretty thin glass. So far I've tried: Pouring at 140 and the extreme end 120 and cloudy. Heated jars with a heat gun, and my work table is wood. All are the same result. Would you recommend - 1). Putting boxes over the top of the candles as they cool 2). Pouring even hotter 3). Creating relief holes and fixing with a heat gun 4). Using a different soy brand 5). Something else? 6). All of the above or None of the above Thanks for helping this newbie!!! 😊 Note *This is not my candle, but is what they look like before burning. The shrinkage and pull-away sign around the wick is exactly the same. When I burn you can see the DEEP cracks in the melt pool usually 2- 3 of them. They appear to be burning fine - I won't be able to sell them due to aesthetics.
  10. Hi Everyone - I hope you all are doing well and staying healthy! With some extra free time I've been really been able to experiment with wax blends with much success. So I've bumped up my blend %'s quite a bit and the power burns are doing great at the 40/60. (40 GW 464 and 60 Coco 83). (Anything less in percentage failed the power burn test). This latest combo has no smoking/soot, mushrooming, and pretty calm flame during power burns. However, with so much soy, I am running into dipping and cracking around the wick, the tops are smooth. This issue is new to me, (when I worked with soy in the past, it was in a different space and never had these problems). Until my workspace is built in my basement, I'm stuck in a open space kitchen / dining area that's pretty hard to control - it's cool and drafty. The containers I use are pretty thin glass. So far I've tried: Pouring at 140 and the extreme end 120 and cloudy. Heated jars with a heat gun, and my work table is wood. All are the same result. Would you recommend - 1). Putting boxes over the top of the candles as they cool 2). Pouring even hotter 3). Creating relief holes and fixing with a heat gun 4). Using a different soy brand 5). Something else? 6). All of the above or None of the above Thanks!!! 😊 This is not my candle, but is what they look like - before burning. When I burn you can see the cracks in the melt pool usually 2 of them.
  11. Hi Everyone, First off, thank you so much for all your suggestions. I've had some great success with my latest test.Yay! So, I thought I would share what I did so it could be a useful reference. I made 2 blends of coconut/soy: one with 90/10 and the other 80/20. I let them cure for 1 week. Both reduced sooting/smoking quite a bit. The 80/20 has almost none out the 3 wicks I used. In both blends, I used CDN 10, CD 9, CDN 8 wicks. The CDN's burned a lot cleaner. With 80/20, I still had mild sooting with the CD 9 size. My 3" diameter white jars are good indicators of this! I used 8% fragrance and plan to fine tune a second round between the CDN 10 and CDN 8. The CDN 8 had quite a bit of hang up during most of the candle's burn, but is starting to catch up at the 35th hour. It looks like I still have about 10 hrs to go, but in the past my issues started around the 12th to 18th hour. My last 3 burns have been very consistent. The HT is still excellent as the well as the texture and color of the wax. Also it is burning much more slowly. Before the candles were close to done around 33 hrs. I'll be close to hitting 45+ hrs. :). I'll post again if anything drastic changes in the final burns. Thanks again!!!
  12. Thanks Nightlight - I've made some blends with soy and letting them cure. I know I'm close because my issues don't start until I'm deep in the containers. I think with smaller wicks and cutting it with soy may solve some problems. This will be the basis of my next round of testing - fingers crossed!
  13. Oooooooooh --- It might be a candidate for those indoor campfire candles, ya know the kind with tons of dried botanicals sprinkled on top. Where's my crystal? - Oh wait, never mind there's a geode. Whew!
×
×
  • Create New...