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I am attempting to create "bakery scented" soy (464) candles for a friend.  Do you find that you raise or lower your FO percentages for bakery scents?  I realize that is a very subjective question, but I am just looking for opinions.  I have purchased all of mine from Candlescience, but I am open to switching brands.  Mine have had poor hot throw and I would like a stronger throw, but maybe not a run you out the door strong scent.  

 

I received some excellent advice from craftserver members on another thread about cure time and temperature adjustments.  That being said, I have a few new batches curing right now--fingers crossed on that.  

 

Thank you!!

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Well, first off, the fact that you are curing new batches now is what I would recommend first.

I use 464 and you REALLY need to let them cure 2 weeks.

I also use cd wicks....So there is the next option of trying different wicks.   I don't care for eco's because I found they sooted.  From another post you put up you said you were using eco's so maybe trying a different style wick might help.   Originally you said you were using 12% oil which is entirely way way too much.   How much oil did you use in the new batches you are curing?    I generally stick to 6% oil per pound  The most i have gone to is like 7%.   It's a complete waste of money to add that much oil and of course you incur the problems.

 

It sure would help if you put up a picture of the jar you are using and tell us what fragrances, and where you got them from and how much oil you put in.

Candle Science makes some pretty amazing oils and I consider them to be of wonderful quality and pretty much I can always depend on them having a great throw.    Now there ARE fragrances that just don't throw in 464 and I just move on.   That is why testing is a never ending procedure.   Now I have found since this wax has new forumulations there were some oils that did perform well for me and I have had to ditch some due to this.

 

Trappeur

 

 

 

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Thank you Trappeur for replying to my post!  Since my candle making journey began, your posts have been very descriptive and encouraging, especially for a novice like myself.  

 

My new candles (with ecos) have 9% oil, which is the actually the highest that I have tried thus far.   I am not sure where you read the 12% figure and my apologies if I posted that incorrectly.  I will gladly post some pictures soon.  I purchased several sample sizes of Candle Science bakery scents, but I had my hopes set on the Hansel and Gretel and the Strudels and Spice scents--the latter one was a lighter scent in my opinion.  

 

Up to this point I have only tested ecos and woodwicks.  I quickly learned that I am not ready to master woodwicks, so those have been shelved.  This week I purchased a set of CD wicks, so I will give them a go soon. 

 

 

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When it comes to bakery scents in soy, I find that most throw fairly well at 6-8% except straight, plain vanilla.  True vanillas are kind of soft, so it's a bit harder to get good throw in straight soy.  As Trapp said, you just have to test, test, test.  And if you get a few fo's that just don't work, as she said, move on.  There are enough good fo's out there that DO throw in soy, so no sense stressing out over the ones that are too faint.  :)

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4 hours ago, Crafty1_AJ said:

When it comes to bakery scents in soy, I find that most throw fairly well at 6-8% except straight, plain vanilla.  True vanillas are kind of soft, so it's a bit harder to get good throw in straight soy.  As Trapp said, you just have to test, test, test.  And if you get a few fo's that just don't work, as she said, move on.  There are enough good fo's out there that DO throw in soy, so no sense stressing out over the ones that are too faint.  :)

Thank you so much!!  

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