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Hopie

How to Smooth Round Pillar Mold Seams?

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So, I've made two round mold pillar candles in the last few days, but I guess I hadn't thought about the seams going down the sides when I bought these molds. How do I smooth these out without affecting the look of the candles?

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Rats! I don't have anything that looks remotely like this in the toolbox or silverware drawer. 

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You can improvise by using a flathead screwdriver, or you can go to an art store, Michael's, hobby lobby, anything like that will have something similar. 

 

They are usually used in ceramics, or pottery, clay work, that type of thing. 

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Backside of a regular table knife might work with a little bit of nylon stocking. 

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I do have two table knives in here...I will try one of those. Just scrape it down the side?

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I think the rule was 90 degree angle and then strip away. Nice easy strokes. 

Edited by Scented

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I fixed the problem by buying seamless pillar molds! Was well worth the money to replace them all!

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18 hours ago, Scented said:

I think the rule was 90 degree angle and then strip away. Nice easy strokes. 

 

Rats! Just tried to remove the seam with a butter knife, and it doesn't look too good. It's leaving a mark down the side. Maybe I do need that curved scraping tool? Would that leave a mark, too? I bought this one because it had the stand on the bottom, and would be more level. I only have the one round mold, since I'm mostly dabbling and testing wicks during the summer slow times. Sigh. 

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The trick is to shave it down close to the candle's surface and then you'll have to buff with the hose. It never completely disappears till you practice a lot. 

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6 hours ago, Pam W said:

Heat gun, baby..............

 

All I have in here is a hair dryer....will that work??

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39 minutes ago, Scented said:

The trick is to shave it down close to the candle's surface and then you'll have to buff with the hose. It never completely disappears till you practice a lot. 

 

Hose? Panty hose? I haven't owned a pair of those things in probably 30 years, LOL! I guess I can find some in the dollar store when we go past it again. Not liking that, maybe I need the other molds then. How do you set these down and make them level? Is there a trick to that?

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The round mold shouldn't be perfectly circular. There should be about a quarter size bottom if I remember correctly. 

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On 5/11/2018 at 12:35 AM, Hopie said:

 

Hose? Panty hose? I haven't owned a pair of those things in probably 30 years, LOL! I guess I can find some in the dollar store when we go past it again. Not liking that, maybe I need the other molds then. How do you set these down and make them level? Is there a trick to that?

 

It seems likely that any kind of nylon would work ... anyone know?  There are other types of garments that might be nylon.

Just a thought!

 

I'm not sure how other people flatten their pillar candles, but I use a warmed aluminum pan and "swirl" the bottom of the candle over the hot surface, then quickly set it down on a flat surface to harden.

 

If your pillar won't smooth out, are you opposed to a "grubby" type of design?  Last winter, I had one that didn't have a nice surface, so I crumbled up some foil and flattened it out, poured hot wax on it and then rolled the candle over it.  It was messy, but it came out kind of interesting.  I think there are several techniques for doing an outer layer.

 

 

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13 hours ago, birdcharm said:

I'm not sure how other people flatten their pillar candles, but I use a warmed aluminum pan and "swirl" the bottom of the candle over the hot surface, then quickly set it down on a flat surface to harden.

That's exactly how I level mine as well. Quick, easy, and most importantly, level. 

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It's the seam running down the side I'm trying to get rid of...I had bought round molds that have seams. Guess I do need to "go shopping" again for molds that don't have the seams. Good thing I only bought one round one, so now I know.

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14 hours ago, Hopie said:

It's the seam running down the side I'm trying to get rid of...I had bought round molds that have seams. Guess I do need to "go shopping" again for molds that don't have the seams. Good thing I only bought one round one, so now I know.

Or don't worry about it. If it bothers YOU then yeah, go ahead, but I guarantee 99% of your customers are not going to A) notice or B ) care. 

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So they won't really say anything? I was wondering if I should just leave them like that or not. Next investment will be the seamless molds, now that I know the difference :)

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13 hours ago, Hopie said:

So they won't really say anything? I was wondering if I should just leave them like that or not. Next investment will be the seamless molds, now that I know the difference :)

Probably not. I mean, there may be that random 1 that might say something, but if you let them know it's just the character of the candle, you won't (or shouldn't) lose a sale over it. 

I view details like that in pillars the way I view wet spots in containers. It's just a part of the candle, and nobody really notices or cares. 

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Thanks. Since I'm totally new to pillar candles, I wasn't sure how a customer would see the seems. I know, seems like a small issue, but I've never sold pillars before. 

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On 5/10/2018 at 10:32 PM, Hopie said:

 

All I have in here is a hair dryer....will that work??

Hey girl, get yourself an embossing gun....similar to a heat gun but easier to use in MHO.  But ya know, know in the long run will the consumer really pay attention to that mold line?????????????  I've found that the consumer focuses on the burn/throw of the candle and give little to no attention to the mold line.........but then if that is a bother to you, use molds that don't have a mold line...........the mold line has absolutely NOTHING to do with the throw of the candle.  Sometimes we Newbies tend to overthink the situation trying to create the perfect candle when no one really cares about the looks of the candle....of course, we want to create a beautiful candle but in the long run, it's all about the throw.

Way back when I purchased candles off the '''shelf"" I  never noticed whether there was a mold line....the average customer is so uninformed as to the making of candles and I gotta say at this point in time, that the consumer will not focus on a mold-line,  they are looking for a good scent.........bottom line.

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On 5/19/2018 at 8:05 PM, Pam W said:

Hey girl, get yourself an embossing gun....similar to a heat gun but easier to use in MHO.  But ya know, know in the long run will the consumer really pay attention to that mold line?????????????  I've found that the consumer focuses on the burn/throw of the candle and give little to no attention to the mold line.........but then if that is a bother to you, use molds that don't have a mold line...........the mold line has absolutely NOTHING to do with the throw of the candle.  Sometimes we Newbies tend to overthink the situation trying to create the perfect candle when no one really cares about the looks of the candle....of course, we want to create a beautiful candle but in the long run, it's all about the throw.

Way back when I purchased candles off the '''shelf"" I  never noticed whether there was a mold line....the average customer is so uninformed as to the making of candles and I gotta say at this point in time, that the consumer will not focus on a mold-line,  they are looking for a good scent.........bottom line.

 

I think you're right....as a consumer, a mold line would not deter me from buying the candle. Not if I like it, and love the scent. I guess I was overthinking it. What's an embossing gun? 

Edited by Hopie

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19 minutes ago, Hopie said:

 

I think you're right....as a consumer, a mold line would not deter me from buying the candle. Not if I like it, and love the scent. I guess I was overthinking it. What's an embossing gun? 

It is similar to a heat gun but is is a lot smaller and easier to use one handed.  I always think of them as travel heat guns really cause they are less bulky and can fit them in a fairly small bag.  They are also a bit more precise on were the heat is directed. 

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