Jump to content
TallTayl

Welcome to our newest members this week!

Recommended Posts

🤗👋🏻🌈Hey hey to our newest members!
 
 
😎You are the newest members of CraftServer!!! This is YOUR place to discuss all things scented!
 

👉🏻We have new tradition to get you started!😊👀👀👀🧚🏻‍♀️

 

If you're new to scented products,  please post a question you have about working with what interests you most. Don't worry, there's no such thing as a silly question here! 

 

 OR, post a project idea that you have. Either way, we want to be able to help you!!

 

If you're experienced with scented products, post a picture of a past project you're proud of! Help inspire your fellow crafters with some of your beautiful work!! Thank you all for making this forum so wonderful! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome!

I would love to see more pictures of what everyone is working on, it helps to fuel the obsession! 🙃

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NEW PEOPLE!!! 
 

source.gif


Welcome! 

Sponiebr
The Executor of Bad Ideas and Sundry Services

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

welcome to the new members.  Do not be afraid to ask questions, even if you think the question might sound dumb.  One of my 1st questions to the forum was how to make a grey colored candle........well, mix black and white..........duh and double duh....kwim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello! I am an even newer member, and I have been hunting for some time now for the solutions to a project I am working on, I hope someone can help me!

I am trying to reverse engineer the process by which candles with colorfully burning flames (green, red, etc) are BEST made. What I mean specifically by best is that, having tested a few available products, I noted that quite often the result is underwhelming, with the colorful part of the flame being only a portion of the flame (just half of the flame, or sometimes even just the tip).

I have been trying a few things, including breaking down these products and finding where they incorporate the colorant salts, and have found that the easiest thing that is done is just getting some salt to stick onto the wick, but the better result is achieved by somehow incorporating the colorant into both the wick and the wax itself. I have been moderately successful in getting the colorant onto/into the wick, but this leads to the underwhelming result that only a small part of the flame is the target color.

The issue with adding the colorant salt to the wax is essentially one of solubility. Even if the salt is painstakingly suspended within the wax by carefully adding and mixing it as it sets, it does not travel to the flame with the rest of the wax in the melt pool, it just settles at the bottom of the melt pool.

I was almost ready to think it was impossible until I found a product (specifically the tealights produced by Joelson inc - colorflame.com) that performed beautifully, and when I melted the wax, removed the wick, and let it set with a fresh zinc core wick, and burned both separately, I found that both burned with the target color, and noted that even though I melted the wax, no salt precipitated out of it, indicating that they had found a way to dissolve rather than just suspend the salt.

I assume this was done either by pre-treating the salt somehow, or using an additive that enhanced its solubility in the wax melt. Does anyone have any ideas on how I might reverse engineer the ingredients in the Joelson product, or just generally have any experience with solubilizing salts in candle wax?

Thanks to anyone who has any advice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×