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Hi all,

 

I'd really like to make scented beeswax candles as my best friend bought me a 100% pure beeswax candle and it smelled incredibly strong. Although having read a lot on how beeswax traps scent, I'm starting to wonder if I should try or not as I'm very fond of beeswax.

 

Has anyone successfully made scented beeswax container candles with fragrance oils? If so, did anyone blend it with another wax to allow for fragrance throw?

 

Thank you all ☺

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Tall Tayl makes scented beeswax candles and I've made them in the past also.  I personally like cinnamon or earthy scents in the beeswax cause I think it compliments the actual scent of the wax itself.  I've never heard that beeswax traps scent before, but I've never had any problems using FO's at a normal rate of 1 oz./lb.  :)

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I sell a lot of scented beeswax pillars. Florals, like lemon verbena, plumeria, lilac, etc. are wonderful. spicy and fall scents all sell strongly. 

 

Beeswax is not the easiest in containers I have found. Wicking to act like a container candle requires a torch. I do make normal pillars that fit into ceramic containers that I make. Those are difficult to "hug" to keep the beeswax burning correctly. Have tveen working on various blends but none thrill me.

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On Monday, April 10, 2017 at 10:23 AM, ChrisR said:

Tall Tayl makes scented beeswax candles and I've made them in the past also.  I personally like cinnamon or earthy scents in the beeswax cause I think it compliments the actual scent of the wax itself.  I've never heard that beeswax traps scent before, but I've never had any problems using FO's at a normal rate of 1 oz./lb.  :)

Hi ChrisR many thanks for your response. Do you make scented pillars? 

I assumed 1.5 oz per lb would be meeded as I remember reading somewhere that beeswax does trapscent but am so happy to find out that's not the case! ??

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On Monday, April 10, 2017 at 10:54 AM, TallTayl said:

I sell a lot of scented beeswax pillars. Florals, like lemon verbena, plumeria, lilac, etc. are wonderful. spicy and fall scents all sell strongly. 

 

Beeswax is not the easiest in containers I have found. Wicking to act like a container candle requires a torch. I do make normal pillars that fit into ceramic containers that I make. Those are difficult to "hug" to keep the beeswax burning correctly. Have tveen working on various blends but none thrill me.

Hi TallTayl many thanks to you for your response. Can you please explain the torch method?  Those scents sound all so lovely. Do you guys use yellow or white beeswax? I read on the net that white beeswax is better for scenting beeswax as apparently the yellow has a lot of pollen and it clogs the wick, did anyone experience this?  How do you guys find the throw at 1 oz per lb? ??

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Torch is a bad thing. It means far too big of a wick that it becomes unsafe.

 

i use both yellow and white beeswax. Yellow beeswax varies a lot from batch to batch. Once you learn it you will figure out how to correct for color and viscosity.

 

1oz PPO is all I use with beeswax. With a wax that expensive already, and that hard to burn well, why waste more $? Use scents that are well known good throwers to start. Most florals fit that.

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White beeswax is just bleached beeswax and not any easier to wick than the yellow.  The only time I use white beeswax is when I want to dye it a pastel color.  I do like TallTayl and use usually FO at 1 oz per lb., but some of my better throwers I can use less.  Beeswax in glass containers use such a large wick that it can cause the container to shatter because it gets way too hot.  If you want to do container beeswax candles, use tins.   

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Guys, thank you so much for the valuable information ?

 

Does coconut oil really do anything when added to beeswax?

 

Have read some use palm oil and was wondering what that does to beeswax vs coconut oil

 

 

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I did not find coconut did anything positive for the burn or throw. Have used Palm kernel oil with success though.

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Thank you so much for the help you guys! I guess it's time to experiment ?

 

Palm kernel oil, what effect does that have on beeswax? 

 

I've just googled the difference between palm oil and palm kernel

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Palm kernel can help make the beeswax less viscous, and easier to form a melt pool with a smaller wick. Beeswax wants to stay a solid, which is a big reason why you need such a big cotton wick.

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Thank you TallTayl ? 

 

Before I joined this forum I was going to experiment with a mix of coconut oil, but I couldn't really find any definite feedback of the coconut oil mixed with beeswax. I then started to wonder about nut allergies and was apprehensive about using coconut oil.

 

If you don't mind me asking how do you incorporate the palm kernel oil into the beeswax and how much per pound?

 

Also, what is the reccomended cure time when making the scented beeswax candles?

 

Many thanks ??

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The amount of Palm  kernel depends on the lot of beeswax itself. Some lots I get are very hard to burn. I have gone as high as 50% in my container tests. Sometimes I can use fully refined white beeswax to also help improve the burn.

 

The lot of beeswax i have now is very easy to burn, so I need to start line tests ranging from 5% on up in 5% increments. I wish it were easier and quicker. ? 

 

I don't generally cure beeswax like soy candles. pillars I burn a couple of days after making. I would do the same containers. Beeswax hardens a lot over time, changing the burn qualities, but I have not found it to be as predictable as soy. 

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