Vicky_CO

June 2016 How to select a wax?

13 posts in this topic

This is a good one let here how you selected yours and why you selected the wax you use.

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This is a good one!

I knew I wanted to work with soy wax and not a blend.  I tested many, many before I realized that each one had it's own quirks.

I decided on C3 which I could get locally and save big $ on shipping.  After many, many years I wouldn't change now unless the

wax was discontinued even though my supplier carries other soy waxes now.

 

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I thought so. I started with you guys will not believe this but gulf wax and string.  They did not make great candles LMAO.

 

When I got serious I had fallen in love with gel candles. I also found out they had some serious limitation mainly being no one want to burn them including me. Soy was just making it debut not many people where working with it at the time. There was almost no information on it so of course that had to be my wax. Why I chose it I believe what hype there was, which is the same hype as today but I swear the propaganda has gotten worse on it. I did fall in love with soy. Even when it would not throw a scent for a week and frosted like crazy. I just loved the way it burned still do. I did eventually move to a parasoy of my own creation but not because of the burn or scent throw but because I did most of my shows in the summer in temp that reach 110 I was having real melting and sweating issues.

 

Now pillar wax was a tough choice I tried all the palms, soy and a few pillar blends in the end I went with IGI 1343 mainly because it a straight pillar wax and I could add any additive I want to get it to do what I wanted.

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I use Golden Brand 444 (soy), i decided to use it when i was making candles as favors for my wedding. it had good reviews on CS and they said it holds up to heat in summer weather which i was concerned about since they would be getting warm sitting while being stored in my apartment. 

i found that i liked the hot throw and got lots of compliments on them about how good they smell, they also looked very nice and candle science gave a really good suggestion for wicking so i decided to stick with it when i went to make more candles. 

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I started making candles 16 years ago with soy because I liked the natural aspect of the wax. I found out a year after I started my business that the first soy wax I used was also used to make pizza crusts. And mice beat a path to my door for it! I have used a few different soy waxes since then, now using 464, and I still love the natural aspect of it.

My wholesale client also loves soy, and they still carry tins with soy. But they did not love the frosting so they settled for a parasoy in the jars. They now sell more jars than tins. For the clamshells they insisted on a soy and are willling to overlook the frosting for now.

I also like the look of 1343 for pillars, but I wish it held more FO. 4625 is a good blender for melts and it holds a lot of FO,  but I'm not a fan of the look of it in pillars.

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Wow...I first started dabbling in pillar candles with slab paraffin from Michaels, just because it was there, an okay price if you used the 50% off coupon and I didn't bother with fragrances in the beginning.  A couple of molds, bricks of color, a roll of flat braid wick and a pour pot and I was makin candles!!  Not the best, but they burned, and I learned hands on while I read everything I could online and in a few old books I had collected from used book sales.

 

Eventually I decided to make scented pillars...they just never really threw well for me.  Not using wax that held much scent was part of my problem, but I ended up researching a container wax.  I read, took notes and read some more.  I finally settled on 6006 because I liked the parasoy over the more fussy 100% soy waxes or the odd vaseline looking paraffin waxes.  I liked the fact that it was solid, cuttable with a knife (no more beating it senseless with a hammer like paraffin slabs) and made a very lovely container candle, and a variety of wicks works very well in it.  I pretty much scored on the first try. 

 

Since then I have tried the 100% soy, mostly out of curiosity, and always went back to the 6006 as my preferred scented container wax as well as plain container wax for unscented multi wick candles I make with my stoneware pots and tealights as well. 

 

As for pillars, I still dabble with the straight paraffin, buying 1343, 1270 and 4625, but I mostly make my own paraffin or paraffin/soy blends and also I make beeswax pillars and tapers as well.  I would have to say that my beeswax pillars and hand dipped tapers are probably my absolute favorite candles, but I also love the ones I pour into stoneware pots for multi wick unscented candles. 

 

I think picking a wax comes down to what you want in a finished candle.  A glowing pillar, a scented glass container etc...it's a matter of narrowing down what is available, or coming up with your own formula to meet your vision of a candle.

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I started with 4627 comfort blend and still use that one. I did try out some soy...and I just couldn't get the results I wanted and I didn't care

for how it looked with the bloom.  I admit,  I didn't stick with it to try to work thru those issues.  I like a strong scented jar candle....and at the time, I didn't want to be bothered with repours so 4627 was a natural choice for me.  I didn't really have a concern about soy vs paraffin.  I'd always burned paraffin, so wasn't a difference to me personally.  I do love the wax, but I don't like working with it.   I also use 4625 with 4627 for my tarts...and I use 1343 for pillars.

 

On my quest for a mottling container blend....I have a new slab of 2530H from candle wic....I'm hoping to try to pour some tomorrow.  I've had it for several months but just haven't had the time to get to it.  I guess I will have to just do repours lol.  I also decided to try their CBL 129.  If it is near as good as my 4627 I may switch to that....just for the ease of working with it.  

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On June 2, 2016 at 3:38 PM, Chefmom said:

Wow...I first started dabbling in pillar candles with slab paraffin from Michaels, just because it was there, an okay price if you used the 50% off coupon and I didn't bother with fragrances in the beginning.  A couple of molds, bricks of color, a roll of flat braid wick and a pour pot and I was makin candles!!  Not the best, but they burned, and I learned hands on while I read everything I could online and in a few old books I had collected from used book sales.

 

Eventually I decided to make scented pillars...they just never really threw well for me.  Not using wax that held much scent was part of my problem, but I ended up researching a container wax.  I read, took notes and read some more.  I finally settled on 6006 because I liked the parasoy over the more fussy 100% soy waxes or the odd vaseline looking paraffin waxes.  I liked the fact that it was solid, cuttable with a knife (no more beating it senseless with a hammer like paraffin slabs) and made a very lovely container candle, and a variety of wicks works very well in it.  I pretty much scored on the first try. 

 

Since then I have tried the 100% soy, mostly out of curiosity, and always went back to the 6006 as my preferred scented container wax as well as plain container wax for unscented multi wick candles I make with my stoneware pots and tealights as well. 

 

As for pillars, I still dabble with the straight paraffin, buying 1343, 1270 and 4625, but I mostly make my own paraffin or paraffin/soy blends and also I make beeswax pillars and tapers as well.  I would have to say that my beeswax pillars and hand dipped tapers are probably my absolute favorite candles, but I also love the ones I pour into stoneware pots for multi wick unscented candles. 

 

I think picking a wax comes down to what you want in a finished candle.  A glowing pillar, a scented glass container etc...it's a matter of narrowing down what is available, or coming up with your own formula to meet your vision of a candle.

I also like the 6006 wax for scent throw but had a heck of a time with black soot on the glass - maybe it was the wicks ? I only tried CS ECO wicks . 

So I now use it to mix with a pillar blend for wax melts . May I ask what wicks you had the best luck with ? TIA :) 

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On June 2, 2016 at 1:59 PM, OldGlory said:

I started making candles 16 years ago with soy because I liked the natural aspect of the wax. I found out a year after I started my business that the first soy wax I used was also used to make pizza crusts. And mice beat a path to my door for it! I have used a few different soy waxes since then, now using 464, and I still love the natural aspect of it.

My wholesale client also loves soy, and they still carry tins with soy. But they did not love the frosting so they settled for a parasoy in the jars. They now sell more jars than tins. For the clamshells they insisted on a soy and are willling to overlook the frosting for now.

I also like the look of 1343 for pillars, but I wish it held more FO. 4625 is a good blender for melts and it holds a lot of FO,  but I'm not a fan of the look of it in pillars.

Do you get a good hot throw with the 464 I did not but I wonder if I did not get the temp high enough to me x it or do you use an additive ? It has an awesome cold throw !

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464 gives me a great throw and it already contains the additives.

Did you let it cure first? There are many threads on the cure time for soy waxes.

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I am a newbie what is cure time in my research I have not come across that term till this board ? I believe Tumblr ( sp? ) mentioned you had a thread with best FO's food r sent throw in 464 can you point me to it ,I searched but I might not be doing it right .

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Soy waxes often require a cure time for 2 weeks +/-, especially for bakery scents. I don't know why, but I know from experience that they do. Even the way the candle burns will change - and that means you might need a different wick!

 

In the upper right corner of your screen, there is a search box. All you have to do is type is the word or phrase you want to find and click on the magnifying glass icon. Look up cure times, or just cure.

 

Also, the board is laid out by categories. You just click on the category and look for titles that might contain what you want. When I first started I read every single thread. Took me weeks. But sometimes the answers veer off course and you would be surprised at the content! And you will be shocked at what you can learn by reading those old threads.

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On 6/2/2016 at 2:38 PM, Chefmom said:

Wow...I first started dabbling in pillar candles with slab paraffin from Michaels, just because it was there, an okay price if you used the 50% off coupon and I didn't bother with fragrances in the beginning.  A couple of molds, bricks of color, a roll of flat braid wick and a pour pot and I was makin candles!!  Not the best, but they burned, and I learned hands on while I read everything I could online and in a few old books I had collected from used book sales.

 

Eventually I decided to make scented pillars...they just never really threw well for me.  Not using wax that held much scent was part of my problem, but I ended up researching a container wax.  I read, took notes and read some more.  I finally settled on 6006 because I liked the parasoy over the more fussy 100% soy waxes or the odd vaseline looking paraffin waxes.  I liked the fact that it was solid, cuttable with a knife (no more beating it senseless with a hammer like paraffin slabs) and made a very lovely container candle, and a variety of wicks works very well in it.  I pretty much scored on the first try. 

 

Since then I have tried the 100% soy, mostly out of curiosity, and always went back to the 6006 as my preferred scented container wax as well as plain container wax for unscented multi wick candles I make with my stoneware pots and tealights as well. 

 

As for pillars, I still dabble with the straight paraffin, buying 1343, 1270 and 4625, but I mostly make my own paraffin or paraffin/soy blends and also I make beeswax pillars and tapers as well.  I would have to say that my beeswax pillars and hand dipped tapers are probably my absolute favorite candles, but I also love the ones I pour into stoneware pots for multi wick unscented candles. 

 

I think picking a wax comes down to what you want in a finished candle.  A glowing pillar, a scented glass container etc...it's a matter of narrowing down what is available, or coming up with your own formula to meet your vision of a candle.

What ratio do you mix with paraffin and soy wax? 50/50?

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